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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently began to build my dedicated 7.1 home theater in my basement. Which unfortunately is smaller then I would have like but who never said that. Due to restrictions the dimensions are roughly 11' width and 26' long and the drop ceiling will make the height 7' when installed. I decided to step the room in from the existing cement basement walls by 2' on three sides in this part of my basement to still allow for access to some mechanical s and rule out any light from the three existing windows.

I will add photos when I figure out how to upload them here from picassa.
 

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Sounds good, Dennis. Building the walls in as you describe will help with sound isolation as well.
 

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Hi Dennis, You can upload your photos using our own image hosting gallery here. Once uploaded you just have to copy the image location and paste it into this thread using the "insert image" icon.
 

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Where you have your picture hosted. right click on the image, select copy image location, then come back here and use the
icon above where you type and paste the link in the dialog box and select ok.
 

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I'm assuming you plan on having the drop ceiling below that HVAC duct. You may want to consider building a bulkhead around the HVAC and then drywalling it and the ceiling rather than going drop ceiling. Drywall or double drywall will have much better soundproofing potential especially if you stuff the joists with insulation.

At least maybe frame that HVAC duct and drywall it so that your drop ceiling can be higher up. 7 feet will seem pretty low once the whole ceiling is up. Even an extra 6 inches will make a huge difference.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yes below that duct is where the suspended ceiling will begin at 7'. Thoght about what you suggest and cannot drywall the ceiling because of pipes(feeds and drains), not to mention the symmetry of the room.

Also I am not to concerned with sound proofing per se. but rather sound adjusting later with traps and panels.

I wonder if I boxed around the duct and did the same thing on the other side of the room while increasing the height in the middle of the room if that would work and not harm the sound.
 

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If you have the option for more ceiling height I would take it. Having bulkheads on either side would make it look symmetrical. If you plan on treating your first reflection points on the ceiling then the extra height will be favorable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
If you have the option for more ceiling height I would take it. Having bulkheads on either side would make it look symmetrical. If you plan on treating your first reflection points on the ceiling then the extra height will be favorable.
Actually that was a great suggestion for many reasons but one it will allow for an easier placement of my projector. I will build the bulkheads and this will also give me more height even under them using drywall. Thanks.
 

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Forgot about that one. If your ceiling was low you'd be worried about people bumping your projector. Keep us posted on your progress and ask us anything.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Forgot about that one. If your ceiling was low you'd be worried about people bumping your projector. Keep us posted on your progress and ask us anything.
Thanks for the help and as this project progresses I will post more pictures and welcome input from those who have gone before me.

But here is a question.
Is it better to cut drywall into the suspended ceiling grid or is it better to use the store bought tiles. My thought is that drywall will dampen vibration noise from this type of ceiling. Also I could paint the drywall tiles anyway I liked.
 

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Is it better to cut drywall into the suspended ceiling grid or is it better to use the store bought tiles. My thought is that drywall will dampen vibration noise from this type of ceiling. Also I could paint the drywall tiles anyway I liked.
I think that drywall will be to heavy to use, also, the accoustic tiles will help with the sound.

The tiles can be painted (see picture), but will not perform the way it was designed to work.



The black wall behind TV and speakers was covered with accoustic tiles from HD, I painted them (double click picture to enlarge and look above the sub, you'll notice some white spots), is not easy....but.:innocent:
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Because I will be using a AT screen I will need to paint everything behind the screen flat black including the ceiling. So maybe what I will do is use drywall painted black in the first slot of the grid on the screen end and tile in the rest. Thanks
 

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Drywall would be way to heavy in a suspended ceiling. You would risk the whole thing collapsing. Even if it were strong enough the drywall would not fit as snug and would rattle a bit. If you don't want to paint the tiles you could always wrap or spray glue some black burlap or muslin over them. You would want the fabric to be fire rated if possible.

Is the reason why you want a drop ceiling because your plumbing runs perpendicular to the joists (ie: on the bottom of them)? You can always run 2x2's (or 1x1's) the opposite direction and affix the drywall to that to overcome that issue. Add RISC clips or resilient channel and you're in a whole other world of happy.

Are you worried about leaks? As long as the pipes are in good condition it would be not unlike any other space in your house that is finished. Your second floor pipes are not exposed. If you insulate/wrap the pipes then condensation should not be much of an issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Drywall would be way to heavy in a suspended ceiling. You would risk the whole thing collapsing. Even if it were strong enough the drywall would not fit as snug and would rattle a bit. If you don't want to paint the tiles you could always wrap or spray glue some black burlap or muslin over them. You would want the fabric to be fire rated if possible.

Is the reason why you want a drop ceiling because your plumbing runs perpendicular to the joists (ie: on the bottom of them)? You can always run 2x2's (or 1x1's) the opposite direction and affix the drywall to that to overcome that issue. Add RISC clips or resilient channel and you're in a whole other world of happy.

Are you worried about leaks? As long as the pipes are in good condition it would be not unlike any other space in your house that is finished. Your second floor pipes are not exposed. If you insulate/wrap the pipes then condensation should not be much of an issue.
All very good points. The wheels are turning...thanks.
 

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All true. People do sometimes install drywall in suspended systems, but generally not good for many reasons. A heavy, decoupled and sealed ceiling is significantly better
 
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