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hi guys, back for more help...has anybody been able to help sound proof a regular hallow door??? I had to use this cheap "THD" door to have all doors match the design in basement... I did pretty good in sound proofing walls/ceilings, but now all of the sound leakage is coming from the entrance to the theater door (hallow)...any ideas how to make it better? will sound proof vynyl helps? thanks in advance.

I drilled tyni holes to insert some of the liquid foam but doesn't get all the way down, so that did not work...:coocoo::rolleyesno:
 

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Mass is needed. The door has none. This happens a lot when we try and match other doors. You're not alone.

You could glue / screw MDF to the door face(s), and beef up the hinge screws. Keep in mind that the door was designed to be light, and all internal framing is in there accordingly. Adding a lot of mass could cause a failure at many levels or areas.

Please don't add more foam. It couples the two sides of the door and offers no mass.
 

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adding a second door to the other side would really help (giving you and air gap between).
 

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Discussion Starter #5
thanks Ted, is there a product that can do the trick w/o the weight? I know MDF is heavy; for sure it will create more problems than solve any... I read to use 2 equal (similar) hallow doors, do you think that helps??? it is still adding weight...not a fan of these "affortable" doors....
 

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Two doors would be what Tony just mentioned. Two doors that when closed create an airlock.

Frankly, I'd get new door(s)
 

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If your going to attach the second door to the first it wont really help the best option is to hang the door on the other side of the door jam and have it swing out into the other room.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Tony that's an excellent Idea...thanks a million, That's what I'm going to do, you guys are great. thanks
 

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They should still be heavy doors.

So you feel you can add a second door? Such that when they're both closed there's an airlock? So you open one door and there's another one yet to open.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
indeed Ted, the door Jam is the same width or wider on the outside...should not be a difficult task, I do some woodworking and this idea seems to be very valid, I'll post a picture when I get around to do this. Thanks again guys.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Ted you are totally right, it will only be "ok" , I just hope it does help a bit more...hmm :rolleyes: just thought of something, maybe I can hang a solid door in the inside and a hallow on the outside!!!??? :bigsmile: here it is a picture of the infamous door
 

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Absolutely. For a really good door, that's not bad.

No. Unfortunately, there is no substitute for mass/weight. Bass waves are LARGE and STRONG. Wimpy hollow doors (even 2 of them) won't stop them.

Bryan
 

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Any if that's light leaking through underneath, you'll want to kill that as well. Sound waves travel through air...just like light (well, not quite right, but you get the idea).
 

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This may be a little late....but that door looks like a standard commercially available door (Maybe by Masonite). You can special order a Safe n Sound door at home depot or where ever in the exact same style you have already. You'll want to reinforce the jamb a bit and use at least 3 heavy hinges. Then to soundproof more you would want to put a gasket around the doorstop and sweep of some kind on the bottom (almost as if you were sealing an exterior door).
 
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