Home Theater Forum and Systems banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Made my first Subwoofer a couple of years ago with help from you all and is going well. (http://www.hometheatershack.com/gallery/index.php?c=458) I have decided to have a go at making some main tower speakers because I have this massive sub and my small bookshelf speakers, so I feel im missing out on some mid bass.

I have been looking around and was thinking of doing a 3-way system with 2 woofers 8", mid and tweeter. My receiver puts out 100w per channel I think.

Any ideas on what drivers to use and prebuilt crossover at what freq would be good?

Also, would it be a good idea to put one woofer ported and one sealed to get the different sound?

Thanks for the help
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Most pre-built crossovers really are not going to do well, unless you have specifically designed it for you components. This has a lot to do with the sensitivity of the tweeters, etc, in which you need to build in an L=pad attenuator. Instead of doing this, have you considered an active DSP? Something like a mini DSP? This would do all the crossover work for you and save you a lot of time designing it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks 123Toid

I was reading up on DSP, it is an interesting idea. I was wondering,, if it is better and easier than a crossover why aren't every one using them instead of crossover? What is the down side?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,802 Posts
From what I have read using a digital crossover gives you much more flexability than an analog crossover, and is much easier to implement . I know that some of the high end speakers are also using digital crossovers too. I assume that analog is used for die hard analog lovers.

Sent from my SM-T550 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
168 Posts
Thanks 123Toid

I was reading up on DSP, it is an interesting idea. I was wondering,, if it is better and easier than a crossover why aren't every one using them instead of crossover? What is the down side?
Hi, the down side is more power amps and also more speaker cable runs. Often a good compromise is to power the woofers from a bigger amp, and leave the tweeter/mids to another. The expensive components in the passive crossover will be the inductors to low-pass the woofers. As mentioned, stay away from pre-made crossovers. I would go with an existing design for a first build unless you have measuring equipment and are comfortable with crossover simulation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the replies!

Just wondering what is wrong with pre-made crossovers? Also, If I use an existing design do I have to use the same drivers or is it just about the frequency? Thanks
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
1,667 Posts
Just wondering what is wrong with pre-made crossovers?
Nothing, if the drivers you intend to use have the exact measured impedance at the specified crossover frequency (usually 8ohms, occasional 4) and have acoustic centers the same distance away from the design microphone (or you). So your drivers would both have to be 8ohms (or 4) at frequency X of your "8ohm Xhz crossover".
This scenario is extremely unlikely in reality, hence the usual recommendation against. Unless you can measure, its best to go with a proven design and eschew your own with pre-made XO.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top