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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have 3 PSB Image C60 and 2 S50 surrounds. My new years resolution was to improve my home theater setup, and I want to begin by getting the speakers off the ground.

I think I'll build some simple plywood speaker stands, but I need advice on how the speaker will sit on the top of the stands. I looked at speaker spikes on Amazon, and they look OK. There are no inserts in my speakers so I would have to drill and install the inserts. Not too excited about doing that.

Are rubber feet a good alternative if they are the right type?

Also can someone point me to a good website to buy either spikes or rubber feet?


Thanks
 

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Are you hoping to get an improvement in sound by adding the feet or spikes? Each system is unique, but even so, it may not make an audible difference. If you are just interested in keeping the speakers from sliding around on the top of your stands, then I think some simple adhesive rubber pads would do the job just fine, without the need to modify your cabinets. Something like this: http://www.mcmelectronics.com/product/28-940&scode=GS401&CAWELAID=220329447?catargetid=1545764029&cagpspn=pla&gclid=CKzL1bO1uLUCFSWRPAodVTUAsg
You could even stick these on top of your stands, one at each corner, and leave your speakers as they are.

If you do decide to try installing spikes or pads to the bottom of your speakers, Parts Express has a pretty good selection of threaded metal and rubber feet.
 

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I have 3 PSB Image C60 and 2 S50 surrounds. My new years resolution was to improve my home theater setup, and I want to begin by getting the speakers off the ground.

I think I'll build some simple plywood speaker stands, but I need advice on how the speaker will sit on the top of the stands. I looked at speaker spikes on Amazon, and they look OK. There are no inserts in my speakers so I would have to drill and install the inserts. Not too excited about doing that.

Are rubber feet a good alternative if they are the right type?

Also can someone point me to a good website to buy either spikes or rubber feet?

Thanks
Does the manufacturer of your speakers recommend spikes over rubber feet? I have Paradigm Studio 100 V.4s and they come with a set of spikes, the manual also states to use the spikes to decouple the speakers from the floor which should tighten their perceived bass performance. Since installing the spikes, I do feel the bass is cleaner and just a little less thick so I think the spikes did make a favorable difference in my case. So, I favor the spikes over the rubber feet obviously. Some speakers however, may be designed to perform best without spikes, the manufacturer may be able to tell you one way or the other and if they say spikes would be beneficial, they may be able to recommend particular ones and how to go about properly installing them. But, I guess you have to also be careful about the possibility of voiding any warranty.
 

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What kind of flooring does your speakers sit on? Hardwood, carpet, tile? My Axiom M60s came with rubber feet, but I replaced them with outboard/outrigger type feet that let me use rubber or spikes. They came from the Klipsch Synergy Sub and fit perfect.

But to tell you the truth, for my uses, (movies and video games) I couldn't tell the difference between spikes or the rubber feet. If I had nice hardwood floors in my theater room, I would probably use the rubber so as to mar the surface
 

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I claim no authority here, but this is a topic I have thought about it a lot, and I will throw in my nickel's worth of opinion. This is what seems logical to me:

It seems like you want the speaker firmly interfaced to a stand that is very strong, then spikes or some kind of solid interface to the floor so that the floor and the whole house now are helping hold the speaker cabinet from vibrating. Then only the speaker transducers themselves are allowed to vibrate, they are more like point sources, and imaging and sound stage would be optimized. That is the theory anyway. For it to work, the speaker cabinet, stand, and floor/house need to be firmly rooted together. Spikes into the floor where there's carpeting would accomplish this. With hardwood floors, perhaps a dense pad covering the entire bottom of the stand. Or sandbags of some sort, but the aesthetics??? An opportunity to get really creative. Between speaker and stand, another maximum-area dense pad. Or more sandbags.:huh:

Other possibilities.
  • Make the stand stable so that it cannot vibrate and root the speaker to the stand, as above. The stand stability can be partly structural and partly by filling it with shot or sand or gravel or bricks or something that makes the whole structure dense and immovable. If this is accomplished, the interface between the stand of the floor seems to be of minimal concern, and you can do whatever you need to protect the floor.
  • Have a "floating" interface between the speaker and the stand. The best way to do this is magnetic levitation.:bigsmile: I have actually heard of people doing it experimentally and claiming miraculous results. Seriously, there are pads made of materials meant to acoustically float this speakers off the stands. I do not even remember where I saw them. I think the theory here is: If you cannot keep your stand from vibrating, better to isolate the speaker from the stand so only the speaker cabinet is vibrating. I think the approach that stops all vibration except the actual speaker transducers is best overall, but if that is not practical, then this approach might be better than nothing.

Oh yeah, will you here a difference? That is the big question behind all of this. I think it is possible, but I would not expect it to be a big difference. So if you go to a lot of trouble and can hear no difference, just remember the words of my hero Buckaroo Banzai: "No matter where you go, there you are."

Hope this helps at least a teeny tiny bit. Let us know what you come up with.:sn:
 

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I don't know if they are still available or not, but they used to make little cones that you would put your spiked feet in. They would protect your nice hardwood floors. I will have to look as I used to have some nice brass ones. On the cheap... a penny under the spikes will work nicely.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for all the input guys. :clap::clap::clap:

I am still designing my speaker stands, so it now looks like I should think about how they will stand on the floor (which is granite).

Rubber pads between speaker and stand, and spikes between stand and floor sounds pretty good. And yes, they do seem to include the 'bases' for the spikes.
 

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well i guess everyones answered the obvious so a few alternatives are dsp correction for resonants , push pull if using sub woofers or dipole speakers wich can reduce in room interaction and i almost forgot line arrays can have quite loud spl with lesser in room interaction
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
OK. No spikes on the granite floor. I guess I thought if I used the bases it would be okay.

NFS2 I like your TNT audio site!

Edit: I really like those stands you built... talk about getting a lot of bang for your buck. I will build something very similar in design. Sort of a standing box filled with sand. I just bought one of those Kreg jigs for pocket screws. Should do the trick.
 

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As far as I know, there is no evidence (from blind listening tests) that it matters what the feet are, nor is there a compelling argument from physics (though that matters less than an objective listening test).
 

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The whole point of spikes or rubber is to couple the speakers to the ground. This increases the mass of the speakers and in theory will improve bass and imaging. When your speaker creates sound inertia is acting on both the air in the room and the speaker. By increasing the mass of the speaker you are transferring more energy into the room.

Spikes on carpet and rubber feet on hard floors.

It's basically applying newtons laws of motion to help improve sound quality. You still need a solid cabinet with little to no resonance to see any benefit from spikes.
 

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OK. No spikes on the granite floor. I guess I thought if I used the bases it would be okay.

NFS2 I like your TNT audio site!

Edit: I really like those stands you built... talk about getting a lot of bang for your buck. I will build something very similar in design. Sort of a standing box filled with sand. I just bought one of those Kreg jigs for pocket screws. Should do the trick.
Thanks Mike, the forstner bits are a must for the flat holes, I got mine at Lowes for $19, no need to buy expensive bits unless you plan on using them a lot, you can pay $19 or more for a single Forstner bit. I also used 4" schedule 40 PVC instead of the 3". One other tip, instead of making the top shelf in a permanent position, I used a minimum of the rope caulk so I could turn the top plate to angle (toe in) the speakers while leaving the base squared up. I used 5/16" ( you can also use 1/4") threaded inserts on base plate to screw in my spikes, also with the spikes I used a 5/16" nut (in between the spike and base plate) to secure the spike after I got them level, this helps to keep the stand sturdy and the spikes from being wobbly, I don't know if that's a word but you get my drift. Total cost about $35 a stand, the oak is the most expensive component but well worth it.
Cheers Jeff:sn:
 

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I made these and am very happy with them, inert as stands should be, do they have a distinctive sound:huh:
http://www.tnt-audio.com/clinica/stubby_e.html
Nice! If I ever have some small speakers again I will have to try this. When I had some BA speakers I made a pair of stands out of a old waterbed and filled them with sand and veneered them... Worked out nicely and man were they heavy!
 
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