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Hello, I have a quick question. I just set up my home theater which I have had put in storage for a while. I could not find my 10 gauge wire's for my mains and center so I used 16 gauge instead. I can't believe that my speakers sound so much better using 16g instead of 10g. It has me baffled. The difference is like night and day. I have read many time that using lower gauge wire is better and produces a better sound but not in this case. The receiver is rated a 75w per channel. So i am thinking that since it a low wattage per channel that not enough power was sent to the mains and center because of the bigger gauge wire. Is their truth to this. I need clarification on this issue. Thanks! Here is a list of my equipment
Yamaha RX-v630
Boston acoustic CR series fronts, center, and surrounds
SVS PB-12/2 Subwoofer
All speaker settings on small on the receiver
 

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It is almost a certainty that your rememberance of the "sound" of the other wire is faulty, or that there is some other larger variable at play such as speaker placement or source differences. It is highly unlikely that there is much difference at all between the two types of wire.
 

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I agree with Leonard. It most likely isn't the wire. Welcome. Have fun. Dennis
 

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Welcome aboard Mike, I also agree, 16awg is not going to "improve" the sound like you describe going with a larger awg may in some instances help with dynamics/clarity when running a system hard but given your setup I highly doubt it would make any noticeable difference.
Did you place the speakers in a different position or in a different room. Even moving them 6" can make a drastic change in sound.
 

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I'd have to agree with all of the above. Perhaps your ears where just overjoyed to be hearing your sound system again and you had forgotten how good it can sound.
 

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Heavier gauge wire will always improve quality.
I'd be careful with this statement. Heavier gauge wire could make a noticeable improvement to a point depending on the length of your run (see my link above), but after that point, you're just paying more for wire that is harder to bend and secure in posts for no noticeable improvement.
 

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That link on speaker wire was nice. I have been using 14g low voltage wire for my speakers since I use it at work and its handy. I have been thinking of replacing it with "speaker" wire, but I guess I really dont need to now. Thanks.
 

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I won't get into the pros and cons of speaker wire with respect to sound, but there is a much bigger practical issue that most users never realize. Being a repair tech, the most notable aspect of large, multi-strand speaker wires is the very common problem of shorts. I see systems all the time that are shutting down or have damaged output devices due to oversized wires that are not carefully installed in the connectors on the back of receivers and amps. People often strip off too much insulation and do not twist the wire tightly, leaving bare wire or strands to touch the chassis or the oher polarity.

I have mentioned this before, and some may consider it trivial, and it is so for an experienced installer or DIYer. For the novice or first time user, however, it may be something that never gets considered. Bottom line is, be careful using speaker wire, especially large wire with many strands.

I think a good sticky to develop would include some pictures of how to properly strip wires and install them, including some pictures of good installations and some of dangerous ones. Any volunteers?
 

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I plan on re-launching the Real HT Podcast as a video series once we move out of our two room temp place and into our house (any day now...was what we were told 2 months ago). One of the first videos I was planning on doing was a Home Theater setup series (as I setup my own HT) including speaker setup with wire striping, connectors, etc. If someone wants to start a sticky, I'll add video as soon as I can.
 

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Just post it when you get a chance and one of us will make it a sticky. I think it would be a great resource for people hooking up their first system, and for many others. Just remember to strip off at least an inch of insulation, the service business has been slow.:sneeky:
 

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Want some video of my cousin splitting his hand open trying to strip speaker wires with a kitchen knife? Dumb guy couldn't wait one day to go buy a tool.
 

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What you also did was replace oxidized connectors with fresh (less oxidized) leads. The ideal speaker connector avoids sending signal through layers of oxidized (and dusty, oily, etc.) copper. Its been my experience that any new wire initially usually sounds "better" than the old. Older audiophiles regularly power down their systems, whip out the rubbing alcohol and Q-tips, and clean all connectors. Its like that hot shower after a weekend camping trip, but your components and speakers and your music will enjoy it. I assume that the gold speaker connectors help. Silver soldering stranded copper to lugs on gold leads should also help. Bi-wiring helps. Reducing resistance by any means, helps.
 
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