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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
This topic came up in an Audio Processing thread. This thread will be a continuation of the topic, as a sticky thread in a more appropriate forum, to cover the following:

  • A list of speaker companies who specify off-axis frequency response for their speakers. This "master list" will be updated as more companies are mentioned.
  • Ongoing discussion as to the importance of considering off-axis frequency response and speaker directivity when choosing speakers and designing a listening room/system or home theater room/system.
Here is the list from various posts:

  • Ascend Acoustics
  • Bamberg Audio
  • Emotiva Pro
  • Geddes
  • Genelec
  • JBL (pro)
  • Linkwitz
  • Neumann
  • Paradigm
  • Philharmonic Audio
  • PSB
  • Soundfield Audio
Also worth noting:

  • Axiom - Sound Power for their Omnidirectional speakers, not as informative as an off-axis plot or spec, but it is something
  • Ohm Acoustics - shy on specs, but utilize a true omnidirectional design, so on-axis and off-axis are one and the same
Anyone think of the matter as unimportant? And where do omnidirectional designs fit into the discussion? Or controlled-directionality designs? Dipoles? Horns?

Thanks to all for your input.
 

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Philharmonic has one of the most comprehensive off axis measurements available.
http://philharmonicaudio.com/philharmonicaudio/philpages/floorstanding.html

Ascend Acoustics provide off axis too. http://www.ascendacoustics.com/pages/products/speakers/SRM1/srm1meas.html

I don't believe the "sound power" of the Axiom is worth anything. But I could be wrong, I don't see it being the same as providing TRUE off axis responses. Which to my knowledge Axiom has never offered for any of its models. Probably because they are pretty bad with the tweeters every where.

Red Line is on Axis. 10 Degrees (orange). 20 (yellow). 30 (green). 40 (blue). Axiom VP150 Center. 3rd party.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
gtpsuper24:

Thanks for the heads-up and the links. A few companies, like these you mentioned, give tons of off-axis data.

There are others that have designs which emphasize wide dispersion, even have unique driver designs to support it, but don't give much for specs. One I am curious about is Gallo Acoustics, saw a pair of their Reference 5LSs in an audio shop out east last month, but they were not hooked up.:crying: Anyone heard them? Or other Gallo models? Impressions about their off-axis response or specs?
 

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Bamberg Audio. http://bambergaudio.com/s5tmw_specs_r2.pdf

AudiocRaver - I heard the Anthony Gallo Acoustics Reference 3.5 a few years ago, before Sound Environment here in Lincoln closed their doors.:rolleyesno: I would have absolutely no problems living with that speaker, really enjoyed it's sound.
 

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I usually go to soundstage.com which do an awesome job of measuring speakers, especially off axis measurements. PSB models in general do extremely well in these tests.
 

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Ok just one dummy. I’m trying to understand speaker specs better. I currently have the Pioneer BS22 speakers & am trying to find a decent upgrade under $500. The BS22s have a listed frequency response of 55Hz to 20kHz. Some of the speakers I’ve researched:
Kef Q150 51Hz to 28kHz Klipsch RP-160 45Hz to 25 Hz (+3dB) Wharfedale 10.2 40Hz to 24kHz
Obviously this is just one spec to look at and the ear test is the best way to judge a speaker. I’m trying to improve my knowledge a bit. Could someone give me the basics of what the above specs means for each speaker? How much impact does each number have? Say 45Hz to 25 Hz (+3dB) vs 40Hz to 24kHz.
I’m hoping better speaker knowledge will make me a better person!!
 

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This one's for the technically inclined here. I write for a mainstream tech site (not naming because I don't mean to self-promote), but I want to make my speaker reviews more useful by including measurements. It's tiresome to read the same vague platitudes in every review - which I'm certainly guilty of myself - with little to back them up. So I'd like to change that with some empirical data, especially as I get to test a lot of speakers before others can get their hands on them.
Sarkari Result Pnr Status 192.168.1.1
 

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Could someone give me the basics of what the above specs means for each speaker?
It should tell you the range of frequencies that these speakers can reproduce. However, as you offer them, only the Klipsch provides any qualification (+3dB) that suggests it reproduces that range surprisingly evenly. The other two lack this but I am certain that KEF does offer +/- xdB range limit and I suspect that Wharfedale does as well.
How much impact does each number have?
I don't know what you are asking.
Overall, the numbers (unless the range qualifications are found) do not usefully distinguish the 3 speakers. More data with more specific and detailed statements about the conditions of the measurements might help.

FWIW, those are probably on-axis measurements and having off-axis dispersion information would be useful.
 

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Ok just one dummy. I’m trying to understand speaker specs better. I currently have the Pioneer BS22 speakers & am trying to find a decent upgrade under $500. The BS22s have a listed frequency response of 55Hz to 20kHz. Some of the speakers I’ve researched:
Kef Q150 51Hz to 28kHz Klipsch RP-160 45Hz to 25 Hz (+3dB) Wharfedale 10.2 40Hz to 24kHz
Obviously this is just one spec to look at and the ear test is the best way to judge a speaker. I’m trying to improve my knowledge a bit. Could someone give me the basics of what the above specs means for each speaker? How much impact does each number have? Say 45Hz to 25 Hz (+3dB) vs 40Hz to 24kHz.
I’m hoping better speaker knowledge will make me a better person!!
There is not enough information listed in those specs to make an accurate assessement of how well the the speaker performs. The one with the lower frequency response only indicates that it can play deeper but that is all. Those specs will not reveal how well it plays in the frequency range. The +/- 3db spread is too big IHO as thats a 6db swing in level. Thats a BIG difference. For example purposes only.. speaker A measure 40Hz-20Khz +/- 3db and speaker B measure 55Hz-20 KHz +/- 3db .. Not enough information but you stumble across the frequency response curves....Speaker A is +3db at 80 Hz sinking down to -1 db through the midrange and then back up tp +2db starting at 5KHz Speaker B sits around -1db at 80Hz and stays within that range +/-.5 db across the remaining frequencies. Speaker A is know as boom and sizzle with emphasis on bass and treble while midrange is lacking. Speaker B lacks a little in bass but its overall response is much smoother so no one frequency group is emphasized or demphasized. Speaker B is clearly the better speaker. This is a very crude example. As a bare minimum, one needs at least the frequency response curves to look at to make a call OR have the manufacturer spec an additional tighter range like +/- 1.5 db ... There's still alot of imformation missiing from frequency response curves alone. I suggest visiting Soundstage.com which explains measrements and the meaning behind them. I hope this helped.
 
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