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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok...i'm always Alessandro.
i've tryed to follow you in your examples but i'm not sure to undertand.:hissyfit:

So, i ask you a little guide to teach me and other rookies....
to improve sound quality room. :hsd:


My goal is to obtain improvements WITHOUT equalization becaus i think my hardware is enough well
to sound good.

I play music with dual mono pre-amp and 4 mono amplifiers.
2 full range speakers of good quality (triangle celius)
1 quite good cd player (MF A3 cd) with an excellent DAC (musical fidelity trivista tube dac)

i think my main problems are:

1) room height 2.35 meters
2) a big window (4.55 meters)


Now i'm free to place bass-traps everywhere and so please :help: guide me to find the right way.


Can you tell me which are the measurements to take ? (and which are the corresponding tools of REW to use?)

ps : for Wayne and Bill : pls fogive me....... my head is made of stone... you will need hard manner:paddle:
to teach me something :crying:

ale
 

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My goal is to obtain improvements WITHOUT equalization becaus i think my hardware is enough well to sound good.
What kind of improvements are you looking for? In other words, what is the problem you are experiencing?

As far as where in the room would be the best location for your bass traps, I suggest posting your question in our Acoustics Forum, where you’ll find folks with better knowledge in that field.

The REW measurement you want to use to show the effectiveness of bass traps is the one you’ve already been using: The waterfall display. If the traps are effective the waterfall will show a decrease in low frequency decay time, also known as “ringing.” The graphs below show the effect bass traps can have on ringing – note the dramatic improvement in decay times above 140 Hz. However, note that A LOT of bass traps are required to reduce ringing this much.






But keep in mind that there is only so much bass traps can do. They can’t fully remove the room’s influence on frequency response below ~500 Hz. In other words, while reducing ringing will result in a better sounding system, you may still have significant peaks and troughs in bass response, especially below 60 Hz. Traps can’t realistically improve ringing or response at the lowest frequencies. If you have significant peaks or depressions in response below 60 Hz that you can’t address by other means, EQ is your only effective option.

You seem to be strongly opposed to equalization. However, equalization is not a “dirty word.” Every music source you listen to has been subjected to equalization in the production stage. I’ve seen people with speakers costing US $14,000 realize audible improvements with effective equalization. In my opinion, the reason equalization gets a bad reputation is because of people who don’t know what they’re doing, or using cheap equalizers. I assure you, there are equalizers available that are easily on par with your equipment that would add no sonic imprint other than what you impart.

Regards,
Wayne
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Dear Wayne, thanks for your prompt reply.

i'm not against equalization and i'm not for religion's wars.
i understand you when you tell me that people spend thousand of euros to buy
equipment to be placed in bad rooms and the result is horrible.

i only need to know if my problems are due by the room or by hi-fi system.
i don't want human impressions but strumental answers.

i'm satisfied of my listening when i hear little orchestras or solo instruments
but with big noise and fast music i hear .... dirt music.
i hope it's due to ringing but i'm not so sure.

so, i'd like to test other rew functions to test reflections......
i'd like to know where to put traps... where they're needed and not where
best practices says....

i hope this letter is "readable" ....it's so frustrating to be unable to explain
what we think.
thanks of all
alessandro
 

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i'm satisfied of my listening when i hear little orchestras or solo instruments
but with big noise and fast music i hear .... dirt music.
i hope it's due to ringing but i'm not so sure.
That tells me you probably have a lot of hard surfaces in your room that are causing echo and reverberation. One of the best and most affordable acoustical treatments you can do in a room is wall-to-wall carpet.

This REW Forum is mainly for helping people get the Room EQ Wizard program up and running on their computer and interpret their frequency response graphs. For advice on room treatments - what to use, how to use them, where to put them, etc. - you should look to our Acoustics Forum (I gave the link in my last post)for experts with that kind of information. They can also tell you which REW measurements to use to tell the effectiveness of the treatments.

Regards,
Wayne

 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hi Wayne, thanks a lot.
Another question about 2 graphs you posted "for me"

looking them i can see two things :

1) Above 145 hz, "wave" dies faster and it's clearly visible.
2) but ....what about 'the shape' of the wave? why with treatments the curve is smoother?
what does it mean?

thanks ale


ps : i'm digging in the post you gave me....thanks
 

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but ....what about 'the shape' of the wave? why with treatments the curve is smoother?
what does it mean?
The smoother curve is the other part of what bass traps do (at least if you have a lot of them). In addition to decreasing the signal decay times, they help make the peaks and valleys in response less severe. So where without bass traps you might have a total of 10 dB between the biggest peak and the deepest valley, the traps might (for an example) reduce that to 7 dB between the biggest peak and the deepest valley.

Regards,
Wayne
 
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