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Discussion Starter #1
What I want is a pair of home stereo subs that can do 16 Hz with MINIMUM distortion and HIGH amplitude. I'm thinking that to do this, I'll need some serious cone area (15" minimum?) and a relatively BIG box. I'm open to using either a sealed or ported box. Rather than use a plate amp, I have available high-wattage stereo amps that I can run (one of my faves will be the old Crown DC-300a - another the Electron-Kinetics Eagle 7a). I think that the quality of these independent amps will audibly outdo most plate amplifiers for both low distortion and good control. I also want this sub to be relatively flat from 16 to 80 Hz. I can use DSP to touch up a few dB at either end, but I'd rather have a box/driver combo that minimizes the need for DSP and that lacks a highly-peaked frequency-response curve.

Now in my blissful ignorance, the above is what I think I want, but there may be good reasons for doing it totally differently. The main reason I'm wanting a DIY (and I'll be needing TWO of them) is because I'm sick and tired of all the horribly-ugly (and I'm being generous and restrained) big black boxes that the HT sub market currently offers. I'm also hoping to save some $$$. Assuming I can do the woodworking, should I look to a kit or to a home-design?

Thanks - a DIY wannabe
 

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You have total freedom if you design the enclosures yourself.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Not total... I'm still constrained by the driver parameters. Mr. Thiel & Mr. Small have some say-so as well...
 

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Not total... I'm still constrained by the driver parameters. Mr. Thiel & Mr. Small have some say-so as well...
Mr. Physics is like Mother Nature and Father Time, they just always win.
 

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Yeah they do!
 

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Stereo Integrity is the sub of choice. highly recommended, especially their new SQL series.
 

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They specialize in SQ subs. Check out their 24" diameter big boy which takes (6) 18 inch drivers to equal it in displacement. Everyone that buys it, is never heard from again, as their search for the ultimate sub is over, and you only have 1 box to build. No distortion as with 5 inches of travel, it never sees more than 2 inches or so before it drives you out of the room and it can produce 120db at 16hz, been there, done that.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I see that Stereo Integrity sells drivers, but not enclosures. Apparently they don't offer kits?

Also, based on their technical papers, the lower the inductance, the "faster" the sub cone's response. The problem with that is that the majority of amps on the market are NOT designed for anything less than about 4 ohms impedance. To drive loads lower than that a "welding machine" amp ala Krell is needed. And although multiple low-inductance voice-coils can be wired in series to increase impedance for the amplifier, it seems that this would do away with the low-inductance advantages and cause slower cone response.

Also, there's no clear chart showing driver response in various cabinet sizes. I don't want to design an enclosure (nor do I really want to build one). Suggestions?
 

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most people use PA amps that will do 2 ohm loads in stereo to dive subs.

SI is getting ready to come out with their subs in cabinets, starting with the 18" models.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I'd prefer a cabinet kit, but a sub in-cabinet is OK too. I hadn't thought of using PA amps for low-impedance loads - They're cheap, stable to very low loads, and have adequate quality for sub-sonic use.
 

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I see that Stereo Integrity sells drivers, but not enclosures. Apparently they don't offer kits?

Also, based on their technical papers, the lower the inductance, the "faster" the sub cone's response. The problem with that is that the majority of amps on the market are NOT designed for anything less than about 4 ohms impedance. To drive loads lower than that a "welding machine" amp ala Krell is needed. And although multiple low-inductance voice-coils can be wired in series to increase impedance for the amplifier, it seems that this would do away with the low-inductance advantages and cause slower cone response.

Also, there's no clear chart showing driver response in various cabinet sizes. I don't want to design an enclosure (nor do I really want to build one). Suggestions?
Boomzilla, inductance in relation to Re (if you're looking at an Le spec be sure to look at its Re as you can't look at one without looking at the other). Don't confuse inductance with impedance. They are two separate things.

You also don't have to go to the super high-end like Krell for power. Look at SpeakerPower amplifiers. Many of our customers use them with phenomenal success. I have personal experience with them as well and have nothing but great things to say about their amplifiers. Super powerful, super reliable, absolutely do rated power at the specified impedance loads, their rack mount with fans are actually very quiet, etc.

We are also working on our own enclosures so we can provide a fairly turn-key subwoofer solution. All you will need to provide is the amp. Here is an enclosure drawing (pieces) that we received today. Getting close fellas. :)

173969
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Became academic - Emotiva audio had a clearance sale & I got two of their Airmotiv S-15 units instead.

Thanks.
 

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What I want is a pair of home stereo subs that can do 16 Hz with MINIMUM distortion and HIGH amplitude. I'm thinking that to do this, I'll need some serious cone area (15" minimum?) and a relatively BIG box. I'm open to using either a sealed or ported box. Rather than use a plate amp, I have available high-wattage stereo amps that I can run (one of my faves will be the old Crown DC-300a - another the Electron-Kinetics Eagle 7a). I think that the quality of these independent amps will audibly outdo most plate amplifiers for both low distortion and good control. I also want this sub to be relatively flat from 16 to 80 Hz. I can use DSP to touch up a few dB at either end, but I'd rather have a box/driver combo that minimizes the need for DSP and that lacks a highly-peaked frequency-response curve.

Now in my blissful ignorance, the above is what I think I want, but there may be good reasons for doing it totally differently roadrunner email. The main reason I'm wanting a DIY (and I'll be needing TWO of them) is because I'm sick and tired of all the horribly-ugly (and I'm being generous and restrained) big black boxes that the HT sub market currently offers. I'm also hoping to save some $$$. Assuming I can do the woodworking, should I look to a kit or to a home-design?

Thanks - a DIY wannabe
I think you have complete freedom to design whichever way you want.
 

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It depends what type of music you listen to and how 'hot' you want to run your bass. Organ music can go as low as 16 Hz, so you'd need a subwoofer to hit those bottom octaves. For most music, however, you probably don't need one, provided you snaptube vidmate have a speaker that can hit sub 40 Hz with some authority.
 
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