Home Theater Forum and Systems banner

Ten Biggest Audio Lies: Agree or Disagree (If you disagree, you must explain why!) Votes are public!


  • Total voters
    291
61 - 80 of 287 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,054 Posts
Dont forget to clean out all of the 0's and 1's that have gotten stuck inside the inner workings of the signal path usually a good abrupt thump with the fist jars them loose. you would be amazed as to how much better and lighter the receiver is after that:bigsmile:.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,620 Posts
Dont forget to clean out all of the 0's and 1's that have gotten stuck inside the inner workings of the signal path usually a good abrupt thump with the fist jars them loose. you would be amazed as to how much better and lighter the receiver is after that:bigsmile:.
Does that work on cables also to free used electrons? Maybe I need to whack my interconnects with a yard stick tonight. Might need a hammer for the speaker cables, tho.

We joke about such things, but these are no more ridiculous than some of the stuff for sale. I saw a picture of a guy who put his single conductor speaker cables up on 12" or so "transmission towers" on the floor - bragged about how much better it sounded. Very large gauge wire, of course, for that 10 foot run...

A fool and his money... are soon departed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
I think the most common offender nowadays is the high end HDMI cables. Their adds will even say things as better picture clarity and definition along with more transparent sound. This despite extensive proof that an HDMI cable either works or doesn't at any particular resolution. How else can they get someone to spend 10x more money for an equal product.
Posted via Mobile Device
 

·
Plain ole user
Joined
·
11,121 Posts
While I would not argue that the claims of high end cables are exaggerated, and many times very close to dishnonest, it is simply NOT true that HDMI cables either work of they don't. When you get to the limits of useful lengths, you can get symptoms that can get a number of symptoms while still getting a useable image. You may get intermittent signal or you may get none at all. Changing to a different brand of cable may get better results, though the correlation to price is not assured at all. I have had very good results with cheap HDMI cables at varying lengths.

Please don't propogate the naive assumption that HDDMI is an all or nothing matter. Like most matters audio and video, there is more to the story.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
What you say is true. What I was getting at is that it is usually quite obvious when an HDMI cable isn't up to the task. There will be dropouts, sparklies, flashes, or even complete loss os picture. There really is no way that an HDMI cable can cause subtle variationd in picture quality such as "inproved detail and transparency" and the like. That's why I say it either works or it fails. The degree of failure may vary however
Posted via Mobile Device
 

·
Plain ole user
Joined
·
11,121 Posts
It can cause what appears to be a low level noise, somewhat like activation potential noise in a PDP or the "hash" that appears in low res color info in NTSC, or in early LCD panels. Some of the problems that I have seen have been somewhat subtle. It also seems to vary with source device. I have seen several situations with cables too long where I could hook my signal generator up and it worked fine, but a cable box or sat receiver looked horrible until a shorter, better, or less defective cable was used.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
O.K. So I disagree with the BiWiring and Power Conditioning items. That being said, I also agree with them.

BiWiring - In my personal experience and equipment, I own a pair of Original series Klipsch LaScalla speakers. The way the cross over is wired, you can connect a separate amplifier to each speaker. They end up being electrically isolated from each other. In this situation, BiWiring, or Wiring each speaker to a different amplifier can provide better sound. However, with a good quality amplifier, I doubt that anyone could hear the difference. But with a cheap amplifier ... That is a different story.

Where can I see the benefit - When pushing amps to their limits. If the amp driving the woofer were to clip, it would only affect the woofer while the amp driving the Mid and tweeter would (most of the time) have a lower power output and not be driven to the point of clipping resulting in cleaner audio and reduced chance of damaging the tweeter. When I bought these speakers I was in the military living in the baracks. I had A LOT of guys wanting to show off their amps by connecting to my speakers. So many of their "High Power" amps sounded horible - especially at very low and very high volume. At the time, I owned a clean 100 W Marantz amp that could blow theirs away - Why? It did not clip except af full volume, and I would stop before that point.

Power Conditioning - Once again, when I was in the military stationed in the middle of nowhere, the local power was so dirty that you could hear noise in your audio equipment. I did not have any high end equipment out there, but with a power conditioner or filter you could reduce or eliminate the noise. Then this leads to a question I have - Power Inverters. (I.E. running off of battery power, generators, camping, RV, etc.) There is a big selling point for the far more expensive "Pure Sine Wave" power inverters and that some A.V. equipment cannot work right off of a modified sine wave inverter. So far, I have not been able to tell a differenct with what I have run off the grid.

Zeiggie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
132 Posts
O.K. So I disagree with the BiWiring and Power Conditioning items. That being said, I also agree with them.

BiWiring - In my personal experience and equipment, I own a pair of Original series Klipsch LaScalla speakers. The way the cross over is wired, you can connect a separate amplifier to each speaker. They end up being electrically isolated from each other. In this situation, BiWiring, or Wiring each speaker to a different amplifier can provide better sound. However, with a good quality amplifier, I doubt that anyone could hear the difference. But with a cheap amplifier ... That is a different story.



Zeiggie
This is called bi-amping not bi-wiring, bi-wiring you just 2 set of wires connected to one amp and the other end to the same speaker so 2X 12AWG=10 AWG
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
When I wound my cable into a coil so it didn't tangle, the highs were gone... :huh:

I do believe that 44,100Hz digital is mathematically "inferior" to analog in a way, but since you can go up to 192,000Hz digital along with the fact that no-one is really going to notice a difference at 20kHz in their music, it's a matter of belief. Although, 11kHz digital wave files are grainy...:foottap:

"Golden Ears" - Yes, some people have better hearing than others, but can you hear the 1dB hiss among 100dB of music?

With speakers, you can hear distorion easier than with those that have distortion at -60dB, but still not very noticable that far down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
483 Posts
I'm just gonna' work my down the list

1.The cost of the cable really doesn't matter. There are differences though. My first wife had extraordinarily good hearing. She was able to identify cables in a level matched DBT using an ABX comparator about 90% of the time. She coached and taught me how to be a better listener. I don't claim to hear as well as her but I know it's possible to hear very small differences.

Every monoprice cable I've heard sounded awful. Blujeans cables are a very good buy for around the same cost.

2. I use tubed power amps to drive my ESL's I don't claim they sound better. They sound different. I believe a lot of that difference is in the overload characteristics of tubes. When overdriven transistors abruptly go from linear to non-linear (clipping) behavior. At which point they generate mostly odd order harmonics. Tubes when overdriven start compressing and slowly start generating even order harmonics. Odd order harmonics are much more unpleasant than even.

3. If you think that 44.1Khz captures all that's there, download the same 24/96 and standard 16/44 file from HD track's and listen for yourself.

4. See my answer to number one.

5. Too much feedback applied improperly is bad. Listen to a Crown IC-150 preamp and compare it to something like an Emotiva.

6. I have only anecdotal experience here. Around ten years ago I bought a very highly rated Technics portable CD player. I got it home and plugged the line out into my main system. Frankly, it sounded awful. It made me think of barbed wire. I put it on infinite repeat and let it run for a couple of days. When I listened again there was no change. On the verge of dismissing it as a bad buy it suddenly changed its sound in the middle of a song. It went from “barbed wire” to very nice and smooth. I had changed nothing. Until then I'd never really believed in “burn in”.

7. I biamp using an active electronic crossover. Consequently I have no experience here.


8. Power conditioners for power amps are mostly non existent. For sources and other low level components they can make a difference. The PS Audio power plants are a perfect example. One of my buddies has one and it made a difference in his system my ex-wife immediately heard. I trusted her ears.

9. The green pen works. By a Uni-Posca from an art supply store and try it yourself. It's only a couple of bucks ($2). that's cheap enough for everyone to try.

10. My first wife had golden ears. See some of my previous answers.

It has been my experience that women when they care enough to listen can regularly hear differences and nuances that most men can only imagine. The very few women I've met who are interested in this “obsession” all had very good sounding systems. I can't say this about a lot of men. They have speakers in the corners, no stands, smiley face equalizer settings and awful sound that they think is “good”. If the last sentance doesn't apply to you please ignore it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
483 Posts
Back in the days of Analog, I witnessed a person so obsessive with a perfectly flat response that he not only EQ'd his room flat, but also adjusted the EQ frequencies to include his own personal hearing test. I guess if you want it perfectly flat, that too must be considered.

*Just a note off the subject... I am very happy to have found this forum. To all of you who welcomed me, my sincere thanks. Nice folks here!
I agree with getting the in room response as flat as possible. Eq'ing to make the response of your ears flat is just plain silly. What do you do when you go to hear any live music?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
I haven't read every post, but I did vote, so,

I disagreed with the burn-in lie, but my experience is only with studio monitors. Every pair I had sounded better over a 2 week period. It is highly likely that it was actually my ears getting used to them.

Good day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
110 Posts
I've read this thread with some amusement, it's brought back some memories of some of the things I was told when younger and very much "into hi-fi".

The one thing I will take exception to though is the trashing of the bi-wiring methodogy; it is definitely audible in some case and very easily measured. As well as the more-dubious interference and back-emf theories regarding bi-wiring, there seems to be missed the very basic fact that bass-drivers pull curent and drop voltage over long lengths of cable. Ok, I acknowledge that the significance of this is very small in cables shorter than 12-foot and diameters larger than 2.5sqmm, and if you're pulling less than 50-100W -but it is definitely not a myth. When Bi-wiring, any voltage-drops caused by the bass driver current over the speaker-cable will not be applied to the treble driver. End-of. Same reason that sensing wires are used in low-impedance measurement.

Ok, I bi, tri and quad-amp my cabiniets, and I know that active x-overs are the better way, but I still have to think carefully about voltage-drops over distance -I know I lose whole integer percentages on the cable to my bass drivers, and some installs are ridiculous with 50m+ runs of 2.5sqmm. But this is live reinforcement...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,127 Posts
I disagree with the tube vs solid state. Of course my logic is based on my opinion that the tube amp has a much stronger sound to it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
I'm adding this to the cable lies but only cause I got the cable for free and didn't buy it. I have a 10-15' cable that I was given that has RCA plugs on both ends that I use for my subwoofer. The cable has arrows printed on it with labeling showing which way the signal path should go from the receiver to the sub. Come on like it matters. Who dreamed up this idea.

Again only adding for a laugh, i didn't buy the cable it was given to me. I know someone is going to ask whether I hook it up with the signal path going in the direction of the arrows and the answer is no. I do it the opposite way just to spite the cable.

One other thought I just had. I have heard this before and am looking for some input. I've heard that surge protectors "die" after a few years and need replacing because the insides stop working to protect from surges over time. Any truth to this?
 

·
Plain ole user
Joined
·
11,121 Posts
Surge suppressors that use MOVs (most) can become less effective with repeated surges, and operate at higher voltages. This is rarely an issue however. Nearly all failures of MOVs occur as dead shorts which will open fuses or other protection devices or open a breaker. The bottom line is that it is unlikely to have a failure of protection that is not seen.
 
61 - 80 of 287 Posts
Top