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If mating a DIY 10" subwoofer (such as a 1 cu ft sealed Dayton RSS265HF) up to a pair of small bookshelf speakers for listening to rock music, wouldn't you get a more satisfying/full/punchy sound by crossing over higher than the typical 80 Hz? I'm thinking 120 Hz or so. This would be more of a "powered woofer" that can play down to about 30Hz instead of your typical home theater subwoofer. And if crossing over that high, directionality of the sub comes into play, which would require placing it along the wall, between the speakers. A lot of "bass modules", such as the dreaded Bose units, loosely follow this idea, but all the ones I have ever seen are pieces of that are severly lacking in capability to what I'm suggesting.

Thoughts?
 

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I was thinking the same thing a couple years ago. I tried it and never really noticed a substantial difference.

The biggest difference came for me when I built a pair of mtm speakers to replace my bookshelves. There is a ton of sound over 120hz that was not justified in my old setup. Honestly, if I wanted a setup for rock music (no deep movie bass) I would not use a sub at all and just build a really good pair of full range mains.
 

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I believe the Punchy sound you are refering to is in the 60Hz-120Hz range which is bass, not subwoofer range. So bass bins might be what you are looking for.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I'm not familiar with. Bass bins. I do not have floor space for either floorstanders or stereo subs. My bookshelves speakers are mounted on little shelves mounted on the wall. I do have room for a small, shallow, but wide centrally located "powered bass/subwoofer module". Would a single sealed rss265hf fill that roll? In other words, does it sound good when asked to reproduce higher bass notes?
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I'm not familiar with. Bass bins. I do not have floor space for either floorstanders or stereo subs. My bookshelves speakers are mounted on little shelves mounted on the wall. I do have room for a small, shallow, but wide centrally located "powered bass/subwoofer module". Would a single sealed rss265hf fill that roll? In other words, does it sound good when asked to reproduce higher bass notes?
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Have you been using a sub at all with your bookshelves?

The dayton reference line is solid across the board. I have never used the 10 you mentioned but have heard good things about it, you could probably search around and find some builds.
 

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costanza,
I did and I apologize. Let me expound a little on my response. Cerwin Vega, being renowned for their tight, loud, punchy bass is a good design to emulate. A small, HEAVYDUTY cabinet, with a 10" Dayton crossed over at 150Hz, +/- 10Hz, a small calibrated port, set center front to listening position, and hooked up to a 300ish RMS watt amp will hit you in the chest like a sledge-hammer. :bigsmile:

Dayton RSS265HF's are rated up to 1KHz, so they should do fine in the 80Hz to 150Hz range. They are not quite as efficient as Cerwins, so you'll need the 300 watts RMS to get the same effect. In the end you will spend the same if not more trying for the same effect, thus the price and Buy_dot_com reference. Your home-built Dayton model will be of better quality (and the DIY satisfaction), but the Cerwin is out there in case you want it quick and easy. ;)
 

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And another thing... lol

1 cubic ft is maybe slightly too small. 1.75 cubes (21"H x 25"W x 17"D) of 3/4" particle board should be about right with some dampening inside. Glue it and cualk the interior seams. Sealing the box will kill the punch. A single rear-firing port would be much better. A piece of 4"diameter X 9"long PVC pipe will work great. Port it about 4" from the bottom in the center of the cabinet. Mount the woofer, centered in the remainder of vertical cabinet. Place the speaker 10" to 12" from the wall, centered between the mains (this helps spread out the bottom end). You will probably need a weight in the bottom as well to prevent dancing :mooooh:. A 10 lb. iron plate from a weight set wrapped in sound deadening material and bolted to the bottom should work nicely.
 
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