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Plain ole user
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Discussion Starter #1
How do you make this decision? Well, it is really a matter of individual priorities, but I can share how I help clients decide.

First, you have to consider the general pros and cons, and how you feel about each. For instance, repair saves another item from a landfill, so if you are concerned about the environment, you may be influenced more by that. On the other hand, you may be ready to upgrade to a new HD display or 7.1 receiver, since your old unit is out of date. These kinds of personal perspectives are hard to quantify, so I won't do much more than mention their consideration.

Second, you can try to quantify the respective costs of repairing and replacing. Some of the information may not be obvious, so you might need to do a little chatting with a tech or service manager at a dealer, and shop around to gather the info. They way I break down this part of the decision is in terms of cost of ownership. Let's say you have a 10 year old 32" TV that needs a flyback transformer and the cost to repair it is going to be $200. If we test the CRT and it has good emission and life tests, and it is a better brand, you could probably expect another 4-5 years of life out of it. This means that to own that set for the next few years it will cost you about $40 - $50 per year. Compare that to buying a new set, say for $600. We don't know what the life of many of the new sets will be, but lets assume a 10-15 year life cycle. The new set will then cost $40 - $60 to own, depending on the quality of build, and how lucky you are. The bottom line is that the cost of ownership is likely about the same, with a much larger initial outlay in the case of the new set. Of course, if that new set requires a new piece of furniture, you have to factor that into the equation.

Finally, we get back to the subjective analysis. You figure the cost of ownership, then yo have to decide how important it is to part with the extra $400 right now versus not, and how anxious you are to have that newer technology set. You can also possibly fix the old one and use it for a while then sell it to recoup some or all of the repair costs, or donate it to a charity, school, or church where it might be put to good use and take a tax deduction for the donation. The relative importance of these factors to you may vary greatly.

Hopefully, this has been useful by providing some of the various factors that come into play in making these decisions. Obviously, the advice that we see from Consumer Reports or others that if it is older than X years it is not worth repairing may or may not be good advice. It is always better to get all of the facts before making a decision, that is, if you want to make the best decision.

I am sure that there are other factors that I have not mentioned, so chime in if you have other perspectives.
 

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Premium Member
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Great information Leonard,

Another thing to consider is the fact that a CRT for example uses at least twice as much power as the new LCD displays and I do believe plasma uses less power as well.
And if you factor the cost of needing a digital tuner in order to use any of the older CRT displays that repair may cost more than you bargained for.
 

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Plain ole user
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Discussion Starter #3
Actually, the power consumtion is more complicated than that. PDPs likely use the most, but it varies greatly within technologies and with calibration. The variable that most miss is the size. A large CRT may use more power than a similarly sized PDP that is properly calibrated. Newer sets are getting much more efficient, so the matter is not as cut and dried as this technology beats that technology. LCDs are more efficient in general, but very large ones may use more power than the smaller CRT that you now have. Going to wide screen requires increasing in diagonal size to get the same size in picture area or on 4:3 material, so there may be an advantage in keeping what you have in power consumption. Also, standby power consumption on many modern sets has been very high and it may be a much bigger factor than the efficiency when in operation. For instance, many sets with cablecard and on-board DVRs can have standby power consumption of 30-40 watts. Those numbers can be hard to find.
 

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Also, standby power consumption on many modern sets has been very high and it may be a much bigger factor than the efficiency when in operation.
Very interesting, could part of this reason be because of the new auto on feature that transmits through HDMI? I know that if I have it enabled in my receiver my Onkyo uses alot more power in standby.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
That is one reason, but there are others, like circuits to receive TVGOS info and standby recording options. Lots of digital circuits and memory can draw extra current. It varies greatly with the set and the mode that it is operated in.
 
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