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[img]http://www.hometheatershack.com/news/PLCover.jpg[/img]

Title: Promised Land

Movie: :3stars:
Video: :4stars:
Audio: :4stars:
Extras: :1.5stars:

HTS Overall Score:71




[img]http://www.hometheatershack.com/news/PL1.jpg[/img]
Summary
Matt Damon has a penchant for putting himself front and center on social and political issues and Promised Land isn’t the first time he’s taken these issues to the big screen. In 2010, playing the role of Miller in Green Zone, he spent his time hopelessly hunting down weapons of mass destruction in Iraq. Now, in rural America, he’s spreading an anti-fracking message through a script that he helped pen (along with co-star John Krasinski). While I appreciate that the dangers of fracking are addressed, the movie is too one-sided and left me wondering about the legitimacy of counter-arguments for the practice. I was hoping for a bit more from this film, primarily because Damon was teaming up with Director Gus Van Sant. This same team had a smash hit with 1997’s Good Will Hunting. Unfortunately, Promised Land is a far cry from the heights that movie experienced.

In Promised Land, Steve Butler (Matt Damon) is a corporate salesman with small town roots working for a $9 billion natural gas company named Global Cross Power. Steve and his jovial sales partner, Sue Thomason (Frances McDormand), spend their working days visiting towns burdened by economic hardships and offering money for natural gas drilling rights to their properties. This duo has a history of strong success, having closed three-times as many properties as their colleagues and for a lot less money. This has captured the attention of Global’s management team and put a spotlight on Steve’s rising future within the company. While reveling in his corporate success, Steve also sees himself as an empathetic force offering folks the financial stability his childhood community lacked when it was devastated by the closure of a local factory.

Steve and Sue are dispatched to a small town in rural Pennsylvania. The town is never named, but could be called Any Town, USA. It’s riddled with rolling farmlands and seemingly simple folks struggling to make ends meet. Their job is to swoop-in, charm the locals, and get drilling rights to the land. Steve’s routine plan encounters a roadblock when local resident Frank Yates (Hal Holbrook) flexes his aged and educated muscles by publicly questioning the safety of “fracking” or drilling for natural gas. This causes Steve to break his standard business protocol by confronting Frank at a town hall meeting. Steve and Sue are quickly informed that the town will vote on their future involvements with Global in two weeks time. Amongst the rush to squelch Frank and win-over the community, Steve meets a young woman named Alice (Rosemarie DeWitt) at the local watering hole and begins feeling as if the tide has changed and luck is coming his way.

[img]http://www.hometheatershack.com/news/PL2.jpg[/img]

With company executives applying pressure to win the town’s vote, Steve and Sue assure their superiors that the situation is under control. That’s when a second, peskier, fly in-the-ointment arrives on the scene in the form of a determined environmentalist name Dustin Nobel (John Krasinski). He presents the community evidence that Global’s drilling activities will poison the town’s land. Dustin, like Steve, is also from a small town and quickly assimilates into the community, beating Steve at his own game. Folks are smitten with his sensible plain-talk and shocked by his anti-Global evidence. He even begins to lay the foundation for a relationship with Alice, which only further irritates Steve.

Steve and Dustin begin what can best be described as a David vs Goliath jousting match. Dustin seemingly gains the upper hand. Knowing this, Steve begins to use the financial might of his company’s wealth, but also begins to wonder if Dustin’s argument is legitimate. It’s at this point that the story begins to change and a discovery is made that not only changes the landscape of Steve and Dustin’s conflict, but their relationships with the town.

The film, itself, is essentially a tale of two halves. The first half is energized by Steve Butler’s positive nature and industrious spirit. Intrigue builds as his seemingly unflappable character begins to feel pressure and unwind. Ultimately, though, the movie’s big twist and the sudden changes in character motivations makes the ending rather predictable. It’s this letdown that makes the overwhelming political message of the movie feel force-fed to some degree. That’s not to say that Promised Land is a movie to pass, I found the film to be enjoyable enough and can easily recommend it as a rental.

Rating:

Rated R for language


Video :4stars:
[img]http://www.hometheatershack.com/news/PL6.jpg[/img]
Promised Land’s 1080p MPEG-4 AVC encode is generally very impressive. My biggest gripe is its 1.85:1 aspect ratio (which shouldn’t be too much of a surprise for a drama). The movie’s color palate is relatively muted, however reds and greens definitely pop with a striking crispness. Many of the movie’s outdoor scenes contain tantalizing amounts of detail, readily found in sweeping shots of vast farmlands and trees. Close-up shots of faces are full of detail and clarity. Dark and indoor scenes are also pleasing to the eye with little evidence of noise and plenty of shadow detail.










Audio :4stars:
[img]http://www.hometheatershack.com/news/PL5.jpg[/img]
The audio presentation is very similar to the video presentation. It’s primarily understated with moments of vibrancy that keep the film alive. The film’s original score by Danny Elfman beautifully conveys the film’s bucolic nature and, later in the film, a growing sense of urgency. It is anchored by a fantastic selection of American roots music that fits perfectly with the film’s small town nature. Dialog is excellent and well centered, with voices having a nice warmth and weight. Surround activity is used appropriately and is full of calling birds, cars passing by, chatter in rooms, and even the cracking of the thunder. I was pleasantly surprised to find some LFE (albeit limited), highlighted by deep rumbles of thunder, the roar of roadways inside of cars, and thuds of doors being closed.








[img]http://www.hometheatershack.com/news/PL3.jpg[/img]
Extras: :1.5stars:
• Extended Scene
• The Making of Promised Land









Overall: :3stars:

I found Promised Land to be a mixed bag kind of movie. It's staring cast is rock solid and Gus Van Sant has given us two excellent movies in Good Will Hunting and Milk. So my expectations were rather high. The film is generally enjoyable and starts fast out of the gates with an engaging storyline. Ultimately it begins to slip when Matt Damon's character shows signs of a change of heart, which I found unconvincing and forced. Not to mention, the movie features a bombshell moment that is nearly impossible to predict. Those two ingredients are ultimately what soured the movie just a bit. Looking past those issues, the acting is excellent and, considering its a drama, the movie has solid audio and visual presentations. I'd definitely recommend trying this movie on for size as a rental if the opportunity presents itself.

Additional Information:

Starring: Matt Damon, Frances McDormand, John Krasinski
Directed by: Gus Van Sant
Written by: John Krasinski and Matt Damon
Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1 AVC
Audio: English: DTS-HD MA 5.1, Spanish DTS-HD MA 5.1
Studio: Universal Studios
Rated: R
Runtime: 106 minutes
Blu-Ray Release Date: April 23rd, 2013


Buy Promised Land Blu-ray on Amazon

Recommendation: Rent It!


 

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Are you sure you need someone to proof your reviews? In the ones I've looked over I don't think there's been a single issue, at least not one I was able to find. Maybe I'll let you write my reviews... :D
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Ha! No... this is just a template thread for works in progress. Whenever I write a movie review I'll work on it here before moving it over.:nerd:
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
[img]http://www.hometheatershack.com/news/bc-cover.jpg[/img]

Title: Broken City


Movie: :2stars:
Video: :3.5stars:
Audio: :4stars:
Extras: :4stars:

HTS Overall Score:68.5



[img]http://www.hometheatershack.com/news/BC2.jpg[/img]
Summary
Murder mystery, thriller, neo-film noire – call it what you’d like – it’s no secret that Broken City fell flat on its face in the box office with relatively little fanfare or notice. The script, written by first-time screenwriter Brian Tucker, had floundered for years before appearing on the Black List of best un-produced scripts in Hollywood. Director Allen Hughes claims that the script was ablaze with buzz while on the list and was a no-brainer pickup. Perhaps, though, it had been there for good reason as the movie earned a beggarly $30.7 million at box offices worldwide, which is all very surprising considering the star-studded cast that was brought to the table for production. You’d certainly expect more from a cast that hangs names like Crowe, Wahlberg, and Zeta-Jones and several other faces you’re sure to recognize.

The film takes place in New York City, a darkened land full of corruption, greed, anger, and political dysfunction. Its the kind of place where the Police Commissioner is suspicious and unpredictably aloof, and the mayor offers everyone a Scotch upon entering his office. Billy Taggert (Mark Wahlberg), a disgraced ex-cop with a sordid past of alcoholism and possibly murder, is the primary character. Taggert’s NYPD career was cut-short by a scandalous discharge and he apparently floundered for years as a Private Detective chasing adulterous spouses and the like. Now, near the eve of elections, the embattled incumbent Mayor Hostetler (Russell Crowe) calls Taggert with a special request. He wants Taggert to follow his wife Cathleen (Catherine Zeta-Jones) and identify the man that is her supposed lover. Big money is attached to this urgent request and the down-and-out Taggert is all too eager to grab his camera and get to work.

During Billy’s investigation his life becomes a mess. A seemingly stable relationship with his girlfriend (Natalie Martinez) is destroyed over accusations that she is sleeping with a movie production co-star, he falls off the wagon, further fosters a flirtatious relationship with his secretary, begins to attract the attention of some dangerous folks, and comes to the realization that the Mayor isn’t such a nice guy after all. It’s at this point that the film begins to collapse on itself, unable to hold the depth that it was pretending to carry. The ensuing set of events involve a death, a car chase, a brief close-quarters fight, snarky dialogs, more drinking, and a double-black mail scenario. All leading to an ending that is somewhat of a let down.

[img]http://www.hometheatershack.com/news/bc3.jpg[/img]

I’m not trying to sound excessively disappointed in Broken City. It definitely had moments that showed great promise and gives an appropriate nod to film-noir murder mysteries. The problem that the film ultimately grapples with is originality, which it lacks. It very much has a “been there, done that” feeling that minimizes the impact of action sequences dispersed amongst a pace that is relatively slow. There are also several questionable holes in the plot that are less than satisfying, such as Taggert conveniently finding a file box of intact incriminating evidence amongst loads of purposefully shredded documents. It is moments like these when you begin wondering what else you could be doing with your time.

For those of you sensitive to strong language and sexual situations you might want to consider an outright pass on viewing Broken City. The bulk of the film is laced with profanities and some revealing sexual innuendo and imagery. The excessive language, in many dialogs, comes across forced and unnatural, almost as if its purpose to give the film an overly mature nature.

Oddly, one of the saving graces of the disc is its special features section. The “Putting It All Together” feature is a 30-plus minute long making of the movie. If I had watched it first, I would have thought I was about to watch one of the better movies of the year. Nevertheless, it’s interesting to hear the exuberant perspectives of all those involved with the film. If you do get around to watching Broken City, which I’m not entirely sure I can recommend, I would highly recommend watching this feature included in the extras.

Rating:

Rated R for pervasive language, some sexual content and violence


Video :3.5stars:
[img]http://www.hometheatershack.com/news/BC4.jpg[/img]
Broken City’s M-PEG 4 AVC 1080p encode is generally pleasing with a realistic film-like quality. The film flips between very dark noir-esque scenes and bright scenes laced with crisp color palates and vibrant blues. Outside of Russell Crowe’s bizarrely bronze glow, skin tones are very life-like and facial details are striking. I only noticed a few instances where facial shots looked soft. Dark scenes generally carry good detail despite lots of shadows, however some noises is evident. I did note a strange strobing blue-line effect during some dark scenes that was paired with eye movement. I believe it was more or less an optical illusion due to contrast between light and dark lines as it disappeared when the film was played in slow motion. Some lens-flair appears throughout the movie, but I felt it added to the overall image and wasn’t distracting. Overall, there is really nothing to complain about visual and the movie has a lot of detail to boast.










Audio :4stars:
[img]http://www.hometheatershack.com/news/BC5.jpg[/img]
The strength of the film’s presentation came in its DTS-HD 5.1 track which is understated but surprisingly effective. The underlying layer of the movie is its deep, pulsating, and bass heavy techno-esque score that rises and falls throughout the movie. It contracts and expands from the center of the front sound stage and explodes to punctuate scene changes. I found it to be exceptional, full of foreboding rumbles and moments where it seeps into rear channels for a pleasing effect. Dialog is exacting and intelligible, full of details such as the warmth of Russell Crowe’s faux-New York accent and the subtleties of Natalie Martinez’s raspy voice. Surround channels are appropriately used crackling with the bustling sounds of New York, chatter in restaurants, echos of a racquetball court, and the sound of exploding glass emanating from the front soundstage. Low Frequency Effects are primary reserved for music, with the exception of a couple of thuds and booms from action scenes.








[img]http://www.hometheatershack.com/news/BC6.jpg[/img]
Extras: :4stars:
  • Putting It All Together Documentary - A Behind the Scenes Look
  • • Deleted Scenes
  • • Alternate Ending








Overall: :3.5stars:

Broken City is a mildly entertaining, but often sluggish, neo-noir thriller that never quite makes an identity for itself. It has a dark feel both in script and visuals, as noir thriller should, but simply tries too hard to make itself interesting. I’ve seen quite a few ho-hum movies in my day, many of which I don’t mind watching if they pop-up on cable during a lazy weekend morning. Unfortunately, this one narrowly misses that category. It’s definitely not a keeper in my collection.

If you’ve found yourself to be a fan film noir in the past (think Insomnia, which is a film that I enjoyed), perhaps you should put this film on your To Do list. At the very least you’ll be treated to a pleasing audio presentation. Otherwise, this film falls into that middle-ground between rental and pass.


Additional Information:

Starring: Mark Wahlberg, Russell Crowe, Catherine Zeta-Jones
Directed by: Allen Hughes
Written by: Brian Tucker
Aspect Ratio: 2.40:1 AVC
Audio: English: DTS-HD MA 5.1, Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1
Studio: 20th Century Fox
Rated: R
Runtime: 109 minutes
Blu-Ray Release Date: April 30, 2013


Buy Broken City Blu-ray on Amazon

Recommendation: Possible Pass


 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
[img]http://www.hometheatershack.com/news/mamap.jpg[/img]

Title: Mama


Movie: :3stars:
Video: :4stars:
Audio: :4.5stars:
Extras: :3.5stars:

HTS Overall Score:78.5



[img]http://www.hometheatershack.com/news/mama1.jpg[/img]
Summary:
“Daddy, there’s a woman outside and she’s not touching the floor.”

If you ever find yourself having a moment, as in a potentially murderous criminal moment, and you hear these words uttered by your child, then be warned: your end is near. Not to make light of a grotesque scene with deeply disturbing imagery, but Mama begins with a solid bang and is quite an exciting roller-coaster ride. It’s a ghost story based on an original – similarly titled – short film written by Andres Muschietti (director/co-writer) and Barbara Muschietti (producer/co-writer) that caught the eye of Executive Producer Guillermo del Toro (Pans Labyrinth, Hell Boy). Despite the fact the movie is full of Hollywood horror cliches and gimmicks, Mama has enough positives and scared-stiff moments to carry the movie until its surprising end.

Like most horror flicks, Mama leans heavily on the element of surprise and suspenseful moments. Similar to a haunted house, its suspense and scare factor is undoubtedly bolstered by the unknown. The majority of the fun is getting to the scare which, once revealed, no longer seems so scary. So, if you are a fan of horror movies and want to keep the element of surprise intact, I suggest skipping down to the audio, video and summary sections of this review. You have been warned.

The film begins with an insane and heavily burdened father (Nikolaj Coster-Waldau) committing several murders, including that of his wife. He scoops up his two young children, Victoria (Megan Charpentier) and Lilly (Isabelle Nelisse), and whisks them to a cabin hidden away deep in snow covered woods. His plan is to execute them and commit suicide. That plan is in full motion until a demented, vengeful, specter-like creature intervenes. With the father removed from the equation, the two children are stranded at the cabin. For the next 5 years they are raised by the creature. Miraculously they are recovered and custody is awarded to their Uncle Lucas (also played by Nikolaj Coster-Waldau) and his antisocial punk rock girlfriend Annabel (Jessica Chastain) with the condition that they remain under the treatment of child psychologist Dr. Dreyfuss (Daniel Kash). During their absence, the children became bizarre little creatures that skittishly lurch around on their hands and feet, have quick head movements, and enjoy sleeping on the floor. However the children cleanup fairly well and appear to be healing after a short period of time.


[img]http://www.hometheatershack.com/news/mama2.jpg[/img]

It isn’t too long before the children begin to refer to someone they call Mama (Javier Botet). The adults, including Dr. Dreyfuss, believe Mama is some type of imaginary character the children created comfort themselves during their cabin years. Little do they know Mama is a vengeful, tormented, ghostly creature that has developed an attachment to the children and has decided to come along for the ride. Mama injures the Uncle, leaving the girls alone with a very reluctant and un-motherly Annabel. This sets the stage for a situation that begins to spiral out of control, punctuated by (for those of you who are easily scared) frightful situations, evil imagery, and terror.

What Mama manages to do – and does it well – is to create moments of great tension and suspense anchored by the presence of a demonic entity that has taken a particularly possessive motherly love to some very innocent children. This creates an extreme sense of unbalance; a juxtaposition of innocence and frailty versus the presence of darkness and anger. As the film progresses, this sense of unbalance is perpetuated by images that are unnatural and down-right freaky, moments of loss of control, nightmares within dreams, children signing erie nursery rhyme-like songs, and of course, the slowly revealed entity of Mama. The film is largely held together by stellar performances by two child actors and Jessica Chastain who plays the very convincing role of a punk anti-mother. Despite some moments of relative absurdity, Mama is an enjoyable horror thrill ride that horror fans will most likely enjoy.

Rating:
Rated PG-13 for violence and terror, some disturbing images and thematic elements


Video: :4stars:
[img]http://www.hometheatershack.com/news/mama3a.jpg[/img]
Universal presents Mama with a beautiful 1.85:1 MPEG-4 AVC encode. I found the overall presentation to be wonderfully striking. The film has a very earthy color palate that ties-in well with the natural upbringing the children experienced during their years in the cabin. This palate is accentuated by reds, purples and yellows that pop off the screen. Detail is extremely sharp throughout the film. On multiple occasions I was floored by the amazing details presented, be it Mama’s underwater-esque flowing hair and bodily scars, the stitching on clothing, or jaw dropping facial details. Because this is a horror film, there are many scenes filled with deep dark shadows. There are a few moments that the shadows exhibit some crush, but all-in-all I felt dark scenes were able to maintain composure without noise while concealing evil and keeping the film vibrant









Audio: :4.5stars:
[img]http://www.hometheatershack.com/news/mama4.jpg[/img]
Not to be out done by Mama’s wonderful video presentation, the film offers a fantastically dynamic DTS-HD 5.1 experience. Surround activity is abound with swirls of wind, creaking floors, moths flapping their wings, Mama’s cackles and growls, and loads of immersive sound effects, all of which are used with perfect directionality. Dialog is dead center, clear, and exacting. There is never a moment that a word meant to be heard is missed. Directionality and pans across the front sound stage are spot-on. And bass-heads will be glad to know LFE is present, totally evil, and appropriately used at all the right bone-chilling times.

All of Mama’s audio accolades are plopped on top of a beautiful original score composed by Fernando Velazquez. It rises and falls with the emotion of the movie and effectively seeps into the rear channels for an enveloping experience. Of course, like a good horror movie, the score has moments of total discord that clash and clamor their way to heightened crescendos of terror.

When you pull all of these elements together you have a truly excellent audio presentation, which might just be the film’s greatest strength.









[img]http://www.hometheatershack.com/news/mama5.jpg[/img]
Extras: :3.5stars:

  • Deleted Scenes
  • Original Short with Introduction by Guillermo del Toro
  • The Birth of Mama
  • Feature Commentary with Director/Co-Writer Andy Muschietti and Producer/Co-Writer Barbara Muschietti









Overall: :4stars:

I typically find my reaction to a horror movie to be one of two extremes: Extreme like or extreme dislike. I was surprised to find Mama falling somewhere in the middle. I thoroughly enjoyed the film’s presentation, which is highlighted by a stellar audio assault, and enjoyed the film’s beginning and middle acts. But Mama is a genre film that follows along a pathway horror films have previously traveled. Cliches abound, there are plenty of spooks and scares paired with the gradual unveiling of a wonderfully complex demonic creature (that, by the way, is a visual delight). What saves the film is a rather interesting and unconventional ending. For those of you that aren’t huge horror fans, you’ll undoubtedly grapple with a believability factor that might spoil the overall like-ability of the film. But, for those of you that are (those of you that enjoy suspending belief and accepting altered realities), I think you will find Mama has much entertainment to offer.

While Mama is certainly not the best horror film I’ve seen in recent years, I’m confident in recommending it as a solid rental for viewers looking for a fun scare and possibly a buy for hardcore horror fans.


Additional Information:

Starring: Jessica Chastain, Nikolaj Coster-Waldau
Directed by: Andy Muschietti
Written by: Andy Muschietti and Barbara Muschietti
Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1 AVC
Audio: English: DTS-HD MA 5.1, Spanish DTS Digital Surround 5.1
Studio: Universal
Rated:pG-13
Runtime: 100 minutes
Blu-Ray Release Date: May 7, 2013


Buy Mama Blu-ray on Amazon

Recommendation: Rental for casual horror fans, possible buy for true horror fans


 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
please do not discuss information in this piece on the net until it is published


Creating a rumble in the subwoofer world: Power Sound Audio follows-up an exciting first year with big news about new models

Exciting times and big announcements are coming out of Mineral Ridge, Ohio. That’s the location of Power Sound Audio, an upstart manufacturer of American made subwoofers co-founded by longtime sub-gurus Tom Vodhanel and Jim Farina. The pair have worked together in various audio capacities for more than a decade. Vodhanel was previously known as a founding force behind SV Subwoofers (now SVS Sound). Farina began his career as an assembler at SV Subwoofers and eventually found his way to the top of that company’s Research and Development department.



Following a hiatus that lasted several years, the duo re-emerged last June and announced the birth of Power Sound Audio along with three models (the sealed XS15 and ported XV15 and XV30) currently found in their Power-X series of subwoofers. The company released a fourth model, a sealed dual-driver sub (XS30), five months later.

Reaction to the arrival of the new company and their initial offerings was extremely positive and full of anticipation. It didn’t hurt that both Vodhanel and Farina immediately received recognition for their previous accomplishments, giving Power Sound Audio legitimacy before their products had even hit the streets. But, Vodhanel explains, the recent failures of several Internet Direct manufacturers is enough to give any enthusiast pause when it comes to trusting a new company.

“Three years can be a long time to be out of the loop,” says Vodhanel. “And [any buyer] hesitation is understandable, of course. But I believe our dedication to customer service was apparent right from launch and that eased concerns to some degree.”

That aspect of Power Sound Audio’s offerings, what they call “a unique buying experience for customers,” has certainly helped the company as word has spread across enthusiast web-forums. “I believe it all starts with a personal interaction with each customer or potential customer,” says Vodhanel. “If anyone has a question about any Power Sound Audio product they can email or phone us seven days a week and Jim or I will have answers for them. It’s equally important to maintain contact with a customer to ensure they don’t run into any set-up or calibration hiccups. We have gained a reputation for unsurpassed interaction and support with our our customers.”

In this day and age, Vodhanel says, reputation is important because all aspects of a company, especially an internet company selling products direct to customers, are dissected and discussed on enthusiast forums across the web. Potential buyers revel in the ability to hear about user experiences from actual owners of specific products. To their benefit, Power Sound Audio has enjoyed a significant amount of notoriety amongst enthusiasts which plays directly into the company’s desire to let their offerings sell themselves.

Buzz about Power Sound Audio’s arrival on the subwoofer scene fed an initial ordering frenzy. Vodhanel says that early orders were doubling nearly every six weeks, a near perfect storm situation for the company. The result was a stress on their suppliers that presented some delivery challenges. While the production capabilities at Power Sound Audio were coasting, they found themselves waiting for key components from parts suppliers. “In fairness to our vendors,” says Vodhanel, “when your quantities double every four to six weeks, it can be tough to keep up.” In talking with Vodhanel, it’s obvious they were excited about the demand for their products while disappointed in having to delay deliveries to their customers. He stresses he is confident that vendors have adjusted to demands and early production issues should be a thing of the past.

[img]http://www.hometheatershack.com/news/feet.png[/img]
A year of success has allowed the company to continue forward with new product development. Several weeks ago Power Sound Audio made their first of three major announcements since the release of their XS30 sub last December. The announcement detailed a redesign of their XV15 and XS15 models. These subs were previously sold with a robust base plate instead of feet. This plate is being replaced by nylon spacers and molded rubber isolation extensions on both models. Vodhanel says the redesign is largely a response to increasing costs from their vendors and the desire to keep the cost of these models low for future customers. The design change has no effect on the subwoofers’ enclosures, says Vodhanel, and won’t affect their performance. In fact, the removal of the plate may give the subs a slight advantage in upper frequency harmonics during louder listening levels.

The original base plates were purely decorative and will be available for customers through a special order purchase. The new design, however, drops the units’ weights by roughly 15 pounds and reduces size of their overall footprints by 1.5 inches in width and depth. “[Through the redesign] we were able to maintain the same performance levels and make the products smaller and lighter. We will eventually offer both versions on our website. The original base versions will be slightly more expensive though,” explains Vodhanel. Power Sound Audio will also sell the new feet in a replacement kit to current owners of XV15 and XS15 models wishing to remove their base plates. The cost will be $49 plus shipping.

[img]http://www.hometheatershack.com/news/xv30f.png[/img]

Last week, Power Sound Audio trumped its XV/XS15 announcement by unveiling the first of two new subwoofer models. The new XV30f is a sibling of the ported XV30 with some major design differences. Similar to the XV30, it houses dual 15” proprietary drivers, a massive 6” precision port, and a 750 Watt PS Bash amplifier with DSP control. The XV30f, however, is a front firing unit with stacked dual drivers, creating a cabinet that stands almost four feet high but with a footprint nearly half that of the XV30. Vodhanel says that the XV30 and XV30f have very similar performance outputs. “The new XV30f measures a little bit better in both extension and output capabilities, however the differences are not something I would call significant. [Any difference] probably wouldn’t be audible with real world source material in most rooms.”

The primary difference between the XV30 models is room placement flexibility. The XV30f has an upright orientation that minimizes its overall floor footprint. The unit can also be placed on its side which increases its footprint but minimizes its height to roughly 18 inches. Other differences between the two models, such as product weight, are negligible. While the XV30f costs slightly more to manufacture, Power Sound Audio is currently offering it at the same price as the XV30 ($1,399 shipped).

Today, Power Sound Audio is officially unveiling an audio monster that has been in Research and Development for nearly 2 years. The Triax, as it is called, weighs in at 190 lbs (unboxed, including 3 grills) and carries a lengthy list of attractive features packed inside of an enclosure measuring roughly 23 inches (H) by 26 inches (W). “Our goal was to create a subwoofer that would provide extremely deep extension, excellent sound quality, and incredible output capabilities in all the largest room environments,” says Vodhanel.

[img]http://www.hometheatershack.com/news/triax.png[/img]
Cue the drooling. To start, it houses three (hence: Triax) all-new proprietary 15 inch drivers. Each driver features two large (3 inch diameter) voice coils wound on .008 black anodized aluminum formers, combined with a vented back plate with direct voice coil cooling. The drivers are powered by a beefy 4000 Watt SpeakerPower amplifier (8000W peak). This kind of power gives each Triax the potential to approach the maximum output capabilities of three XS30 subwoofers within an intended operating bandwidth of 5-150 Hz.

Each Triax carries two different DSP programs that dictate frequency shaping below 30 Hz. “These two programs are user selectable via an amplifier mounted switch,” explains Vodhanel. “Program One will include frequency shaping that will allow the Triax to extend into the single digits in medium to medium-large rooms. Program Two will be more suited to extremely deep extension in large to very large room areas.”

Vodhanel says that the Triax will deliver excellent sound quality with some advantages that push it slightly ahead of other Power Sound Audio subwoofer models. Of course this is the bottom-line interest for most subwoofer owners. Physically speaking, the Triax will be the first Power Sound Audio subwoofer offered with multiple finish options, including the satin black finish offered on other Power-X subwoofers and five different wood veneer choices. Look for Power Sound Audio to expand these veneer options to other subwoofer models soon. “We will be offering these real wood veneering options on our more popular models in the future. The XV15 and XS30 will both [eventually] be available in five different veneers,” says Vodhanel. He added: “Of course American made furniture grade cabinets come with a price premium, but we will make every attempt to keep the price as low as possible.”

Pricing for the new Triax will begin with a pre-order offering of $2799 shipped (satin black finish only).

For more information on Power Sound Audio’s products, or to place an order, visit their website. Also, the Home Theater Shack and Power Sound Audio are preparing to announce an exciting promotional giveaway. Details will be announced on hometheatershack.com in the very near future.

Image Credits: Power Sound Audio
 

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Today, Power Sound Audio is officially unveiling an audio monster that has been in Research and Development for nearly 2 years. The Triax, as it is called, weighs in at 190 lbs (unboxed, including 3 grills) and carries a lengthy list of attractive features packed inside of an enclosure measuring roughly 23 inches (H) by 26 inches (W). “Our goal was to create a subwoofer that would provide extremely deep extension, excellent sound quality, and incredible output capabilities in all the largest room environments,” says Vodhanel.

Cue the drooling. To start, it houses three (hence: Triax) all-new proprietary 15 inch drivers. Each driver features two large (3 inch diameter) voice coils wound on .008 black anodized aluminum formers, combined with a vented back plate with direct voice coil cooling. The drivers are powered by a beefy 4000 Watt amplifier (8000W peak). This kind of power gives each Triax the potential to approach the maximum output capabilities of three XS30 subwoofers within an intended operating bandwidth of 5-150 Hz.

Each Triax carries two different DSP programs that dictate frequency shaping below 30 Hz. “These two programs are user selectable via an amplifier mounted switch,” explains Vodhanel. “Program One will include frequency shaping that will allow the Triax to extend into the single digits in medium to medium-large rooms. Program Two will be more suited to extremely deep extension in large to very large room areas.”

Vodhanel says that the Triax will deliver excellent sound quality with some advantages that push it slightly ahead of other Power Sound Audio subwoofer models. Of course this is the bottom-line interest for most subwoofer owners. Physically speaking, the Triax will be the first Power Sound Audio subwoofer offered with multiple finish options, including the satin black finish offered on other Power-X subwoofers and five different wood veneer choices. Look for Power Sound Audio to expand these veneer options to other subwoofer models soon. “We will be offering these real wood veneering options on our more popular models in the future. The XV15 and XS30 will both [eventually] be available in five different veneers,” says Vodhanel. He added: “Of course American made furniture grade cabinets come with a price premium, but we will make every attempt to keep the price as low as possible.”

Pricing for the new Triax will begin with a pre-order offering of $2799 shipped (satin black finish only).


I can't even imagine such a beast. Since it's inception PSA's calling card has been extreme value, and $2800 is a huge jump up in price class so I'm not sure how that will play out with the masses, but this thing is probably going to dislodge fillings. From your next door neighbor... :hsd:
 

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I can't even imagine such a beast. Since it's inception PSA's calling card has been extreme value, and $2800 is a huge jump up in price class so I'm not sure how that will play out with the masses, but this thing is probably going to dislodge fillings. From your next door neighbor... :hsd:
I've seen a picture of it. It looks fantastic. They've been very secretive about it... I know they are looking forward to the announcement.

This article is waiting for their announcement to go up... which should be happening in the next hour. I'm sure the net will be buzzing about it.
 

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That price is lower than he initially told me... and sounds like an incredible deal with that amp.

I hope we can get a review of one really soon!
 

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I've seen a picture of it. It looks fantastic. They've been very secretive about it... I know they are looking forward to the announcement.
About two months ago Tom told me to 'stay tuned for some big news'. When I saw the XV30f I figured that's what he was alluding to, but apparently not.
 

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o..m...starry skies....0.0 my poor house would be decimiated with one of those....Mike waaaaaaaaaaaaants................
 

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I can't even imagine such a beast. Since it's inception PSA's calling card has been extreme value, and $2800 is a huge jump up in price class so I'm not sure how that will play out with the masses, but this thing is probably going to dislodge fillings. From your next door neighbor... :hsd:
Seaton has been successfully selling in this price bracket for years, I suspect PSA will too. It won't be for the masses, though... :spend:

PSA drivers appear to be sourced from Eminence, just like Seaton and former Chase subs. The new Triax driver looks from the pic to be the same LAB 15 the SubMersive uses. I wouldn't be surprised if the driver has proprietary tweaks done, that is commonly done for these ID guys to maximize performance.
 

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Seaton has been successfully selling in this price bracket for years, I suspect PSA will too. It won't be for the masses, though... :spend:
I don't doubt PSA will be successful, only that they jumped categories pretty quickly. Mark has never been known to sell value oriented products - his have always been expensive from the beginning, so his market is defined thusly. PSA started as a 'bang for the buck' company, and within a year are now selling products in the multi-thousand range. That's quite a leap. For $2800 it's definitely a bargain, relative to it's intended competition, I just wonder how much of a market it will have after the initial surge of orders.
 
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