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I have noticed that some of the members of this forum have started to post some of their DIY speaker projects. About 5 years ago I started building my own speakers for myself and some close friends. Below is a list of the various speakers I have built. If anyone is interested in any of the designs below I can provide additional comments.

ACI Titan II subwoofer kit (no longer available in kit form)

Northcreek Music Systems Rhythm Revelator kit http://www.northcreekmusic.com/NorthCreekKits.html

Needles, by Jim Griffin (3” Tang Band line array with Aurum Cantus ribbon tweeter)

Jordan JX92S 8 liter monitors http://www.ejjordan.co.uk/systems/jx92_system.html

Jordan JX92S/Aurum Cantus mini-monitor, by Jim Griffin

Stereo Vifa MA26WR subs

CSS125FR/125WR MLTL, by Jim Griffin http://homepage.mac.com/tlinespeakers/FAL/downloads/BipolarMLTLDesignPak.pdf

Jordan JX92S/Aurum Cantus MLTL – This speaker is really the Griffin mini-monitor rebuilt into an MLTL enclosure. I built this speaker towards the end of last year with Jim’s help. He recently has built his own version of this speaker http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=81634 .

Exodus 2641 kit http://www.diycable.com/main/product_info.php?cPath=24_92&products_id=571

Exodus LCR kit http://www.diycable.com/main/product_info.php?cPath=24_92&products_id=541

And most recently I have been playing around with the new Jordan JXR6 HD 2” full range drivers http://www.ejjordan.co.uk/drivers/jxr6.html . I have built a couple of different small boxes for use as PC speakers. I am just finishing up a new center channel using two Jordan JX92S and one JXR6.

Of all the above speaker deigns I think the Exodus designs offer the best cost to performance ratio for people looking for high quality home theater speakers. Some of the other designs lend themselves to better two channel, and the CSS125FR/125WR MLTL design is a truly amazing speaker for those looking to build on a very tight budget (kit and wood under $300). I really like the Jordan speakers too. With the fall of the US dollar the cost of Jordan’s has increased from $110 to $170 each.

Again, I can post pictures and offer more info should anyone be interested.
 

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I'm interested! :neener:
 
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Like I said, I think the Exodus 2641 and the Exodus LCR are most likely the best home theater speakers I have built. The design for the speakers was done by Adire Audio (I think), and two of the three drivers in the design are manufactured by them. Do a search on Extremis 6.8 and CSSWR125 to learn more about the mid and bass drivers.

The kits are sold under Exodus Audio and are sold by a number of different online audio dealers. The cost for both the 2641 and LCR are around $400 per kit. Wood, veneer and other supplies make each speaker close to $550 each to build. I have built two sets of these speakers for two different friends (one black oak and the other natural cherry).

I have compared the 2641 to my Rhythm Revelator speakers (twice the cost, and can be seen next to the black 2641 in the attached picture) and really to me they are really a toss up… The 2641 gives you fuller bass that packs a punch but the Rhythm has a wider sound stage. Again, really I could live with either and at half the cost, not to mention North Creek Music is getting out of the kit business, the 2641 is a great deal for what you get.
 

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Sorry for the double post… I forgot to mention that I prefer a full wrapped veneered speaker. The photos I included show how one piece of veneer is used to wrap the whole speaker. The seam is on the back of the speaker. I used one sheet of 4’ X 8’ veneer for both speakers.
 
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This photo is the new center channel I am working on for my bedroom. The plan is to hang it above a 32” LCD TV. Currently, it sits on my floor under my TV in my family room while I tweak the crossover. Once I get the crossover worked out, I will stain and finish the speaker. I built this speaker out of maple. The front is a ¾” solid maple and the sides are veneered. Because of the sloped baffle I wasn’t able to wrap the whole speaker.

For the most part I am really happy with the design so far. I really like the Jordan speakers and I think they look cool too. I could have opted for a cheaper woofer to mate with the smaller Jordan JXR6, but really wanted the look of all metal driver (I am not putting a grill on this speaker).

The JXR6 is a full range driver that can be crossed as low as 120 Hz. Well in theory anyway. I find crossing it around 250 Hz is a little easer on the driver and allows for more SPL. These guys aren’t cheep however; cost is around $125 each. They are new too and not a whole lot of designs exist yet either.
 

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Fine job Hardman... :T

Those look gorgeous! I can't even tell there is a seam on the back of the one up top there. How did you finish out the tops?
 
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I veneer the top of the speakers with the same material and use a flush trim bit in my router to finish the edge. I did run the grain side to side instead of front to back on the top of the cherry speakers, but this enabled me to use one 4' X 8' sheet for both speakers. Normally my preference would be front to back grain to match the front baffle (this is how I finished the black oak pair).
 
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I usually build without grills. I like the look of the drivers. One neat trick, if you want grills, is to use a forstner drill bit to cut a flat bottom hole in the baffle and then either epoxy rare earth magnets into the baffle or use a system like this http://www.leevalley.com/hardware/page.aspx?c=2&p=42348&cat=3,42363 (see the attached picture). Then veneer as normal. If you ever need baffles in the future just put a washer in the frame of the grill.
 

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It looks like this thread is turning into a veneering thread… maybe we should start a new thread that covers this topic specifically? For the record, I don’t claim to be an expert at veneering so take much of what I say with a grain of salt.

For veneer I have had good success with GL Veneer paper backed veneer http://www.glveneer.com/ . They come in different sizes, but 4’ X 8’ sheets seem to offer the best price (I once use a 4’ X 10’sheet for a set of speakers, and the extra 2’ saved me from having to by another 4’ X 8’ sheet). GL Veneer doesn’t sell to the end user, but you should be able to locate a distributor for your area (check their website). I live in Utah and buy most of my veneering products from either http://www.edgebanding-services.com/ or http://www.macbeath.com/ . Both companies are local and generally give me better than retail pricing.

I am still learning about glue and while none of my speakers have ever had the veneer fail using normal contact cement, I know there are better glues or processes for paper backed veneer, but most of these aren’t geared to the DIYer. I think the main thing to remember when using contact cement is to give it proper time to cure after the veneer has been applied and then go easy on lacquer based finishes. I am switching to more water based finish and stain these days and so far these products haven’t caused any issues either. I also always apply two coats of glue to MDF surfaces.

For tools I use a piece of hardwood with the edge slightly rounded to press the veneer to the substrate and then finish with a J roller. I don’t use any fancy veering tools to cut the veneer to size but just use a new razor blade in my utility knife. To trim the edges I use a flush trim router bit with a bearing and for the speaker cutouts I use a Whiteside SC28C router bit that works perfectly http://www.routerbits.com/cgi-routerbits/sr.cgi?1153317221_15160+2 . To apply the glue I use a roller with an adhesive nap. ESI (link above) sells these rollers and they are designed for contact cement, but I have also use a pink 3/16” nap roller from Home Depot too. The most important tool, in my opinion, is wax paper! After I have applied the glue to the cabinet, and it has had time to setup, I cover it with normal wax paper and only expose a small areas where I plan to start. I remove wax paper as I go in a controlled way.

The Whiteside router bit is unique and the only one I have been able to find like it. What makes this route bit so special is its 1/8” flat bottom tip. I veneer the whole speaker and cut the holes for the driver after I have finished the veneering job. I use the bottom of this bit to run around the driver mortis like a barring. I have yet to find a driver that didn’t need a mortis of at least 1/8” depth to flush mount the driver. Should I ever encounter such a driver in the future I will just use more gasket material.

Now there are other ways to accomplish cutting the veneer around the driver cutouts. One way is to first cut the through hole and then use a rabbit bit to make the driver mortis. To trim the veneer around the driver just use the same rabbit bit. But this only works on round speakers and forces you to set rabbit barring sizes for your mortis. Before I found this bit I would often just make my baffles out of real wood that matched the veneer.
 

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I welcome all! Who be will help to find datasheet on Exodus 2641 kit. This kit any more do not make also the information on it have removed. Very much I wish to make him, under the available data and drawings. If who that has though what that the information, please, write me the letter strateg55(a-t)gmail(point)com Thankful in advance.:wave:
 
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