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Discussion Starter #1
Riddle me this, Batman:

Is it best to run the audio/video HDMI into the Pre-amp, with the video then going to the projector (or TV), or do you run a separate video HDMI to your projector, with an audio only HDMI to the Pre-Pro?

Is it better for the video to completely bypass the processor, running directly to the projector? Why?

The components considered are:

Yamaha CX-A5200
Epson 5050UB
Panasonic DP-UB820/UB900
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I doubt with a unit like the A5200 you’ll see any degradation passing the signal through it. You can certainly run the source HDMI straight to the projector, but that‘s not very practical if you have multiple sources.

Regards,
Wayne
Thanks. Yes, more convenient to run all of the connections thru the Yamaha.

That is one thing I miss with my Panasonic Projector. It had 3 HDMI, 1 Component Video, and 1 S-Video input. My Epson has only 2 HDMI's. That's it.
 

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If you can disable all video processing in the AVR/processor, there is no difference. You may or may not be able to disable all video processing in the AVR/processor though. If you want on-screen displays for volume, mute, and any other settings/menus that overlay active video, the AVR or pre/pro MUST have on-board video processing in order to deliver the on-screen graphics. If you can run test patterns on the disc player and measure them on the display without the AVR/pre-pro, then run the same signals/patterns through the AVR/pre-pro and measure them again, you'll be able to tell if the pre-pro is changing the video... at least in terms of luminance and color. But with any controls that COULD change the video set to OFF, every AVR/pre-pro I've ever checked (a lot) have not changed the video with obvious video controls set to OFF or zero. Digital video does not change in any way when it moves around on cables. It requires "intelligent" manipulation of the signal to change any video... random changes caused by cables being very long will produce "sparkle" artifacts or no video... there is no other way digital video can be affected by cables (which have no intelligence for changing bits in the video signal). Random changes to a video signal can easily make entire frames unviewable... just by having the wrong bit(s) changed.
 
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