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Hi.. what gauge of wire should I use from the pro amp to driver? Planning to get a pro amp maybe around 2000W

12AWG or 10AWG?

Does connecting the DVCs together need a thicker wire?
 

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Either will be fine. I use 12 gauge with 2500w to my sub with no problem. It's distance you need to worry about because od signal degradation.

Wire size 2 Ω load 4 Ω load 6 Ω load 8 Ω load
22 AWG (0.326 mm²) 3 ft (0.9 m) 6 ft (1.8 m) 9 ft (2.7 m) 12 ft (3.6 m)
20 AWG (0.518 mm²) 5 ft (1.5 m) 10 ft (3 m) 15 ft (4.5 m) 20 ft (6 m)
18 AWG (0.823 mm²) 8 ft (2.4 m) 16 ft (4.9 m) 24 ft (7.3 m) 32 ft (9.7 m)
16 AWG (1.31 mm²) 12 ft (3.6 m) 24 ft (7.3 m) 36 ft (11 m) 48 ft (15 m)
14 AWG (2.08 mm²) 20 ft (6.1 m) 40 ft (12 m) 60 ft (18 m)* 80 ft (24 m)*
12 AWG (3.31 mm²) 30 ft (9.1 m) 60 ft (18 m)* 90 ft (27 m)* 120 ft (36 m)*
10 AWG (5.26 mm²) 50 ft (15 m) 100 ft (30 m)* 150 ft (46 m)* 200 ft (61 m)*
 

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Think of the electrical standards as the power going to your speakers is AC voltage so a 15amp circuit drawing 12amps is equal to 1800watts and that circuit is required to use 14awg wire so for a sub that requires between 1000-2000watts 14awg would do however its always better to go heaver. 12awg as TC mentioned would be ideal.
 

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It will, It just get's tougher to work with as it gets thicker.
 

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It will, It just get's tougher to work with as it gets thicker.
That's the truth: the 'discount' 12g in-wall rated stuff I bought has fewer strands and is very stiff for connections. It pulled great, but is definitely less flexible for tighter turns/connection to posts. Think it was cheaper carol wire (I think they have two types) with a heavy white outer insulator jacket.
 

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Thank you for this another great bit of information from this fantastic forum. Cheers Troy

Either will be fine. I use 12 gauge with 2500w to my sub with no problem. It's distance you need to worry about because od signal degradation.

Wire size 2 Ω load 4 Ω load 6 Ω load 8 Ω load
22 AWG (0.326 mm²) 3 ft (0.9 m) 6 ft (1.8 m) 9 ft (2.7 m) 12 ft (3.6 m)
20 AWG (0.518 mm²) 5 ft (1.5 m) 10 ft (3 m) 15 ft (4.5 m) 20 ft (6 m)
18 AWG (0.823 mm²) 8 ft (2.4 m) 16 ft (4.9 m) 24 ft (7.3 m) 32 ft (9.7 m)
16 AWG (1.31 mm²) 12 ft (3.6 m) 24 ft (7.3 m) 36 ft (11 m) 48 ft (15 m)
14 AWG (2.08 mm²) 20 ft (6.1 m) 40 ft (12 m) 60 ft (18 m)* 80 ft (24 m)*
12 AWG (3.31 mm²) 30 ft (9.1 m) 60 ft (18 m)* 90 ft (27 m)* 120 ft (36 m)*
10 AWG (5.26 mm²) 50 ft (15 m) 100 ft (30 m)* 150 ft (46 m)* 200 ft (61 m)*
 

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Also keeping the amps closer to the fronts will reduce the resistance (is that not correct).
Maybe I'm misunderstanding your comment, but keeping the amps closer to the speakers they are driving reduces the potential cable length, which will reduce resistance.
 

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Maybe I'm misunderstanding your comment, but keeping the amps closer to the speakers they are driving reduces the potential cable length, which will reduce resistance.
yeah A9X

I think I meant to say the power (db loss).
 

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Why would you need thicker cable? 16 awg works for almost every application in home theater. Using higher gauge is unnecessary. Attenuation happens well above the subwoofer range anyway. You should generally not make runs longer than 50 feet because the signal tends to match the impedance curve as it goes above this length(though for surrounds it's not a big deal)

If you have a 20 amp line then 12 gauge can be useful, but I think for peaks 16 can handle it just fine.
 
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