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I got this from a friend and I really like what is being presented here. Any thoughts ?? Have todays quick cuts on tv, commercials, the internet changed the very way we look at movie scenes. Can we no longer dwell on a subject or person, do we tend to need that speed of cuts to keep us involved....and I wont mention the unsteady cam so loved by Tony Scott.



https://vimeo.com/68514760
 

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I have to agree - partially.

Neorealism - in movies, the practice of portraying the lives of the working class and poor, often on location and with non-professional actors, and with minimalist production and effects, minmal special lighting, no makeup - tends challenge a lot of viewers, and many who are used to quick cuts and glitzy presentation might not have patience for it.

OTOH, in music anyway, the heavily-produced album with non-natural effects has become an art form in its own right, I personally enjoy a well done track that can be devoid of all sense of realism.

I guess your question - can realism be appreciated by the typical modern listener / movie viewer? - gets us to look at exposure, school music programs, commonly available media sources - and ask if they are doing a disservice by focusing only on satisfying least-common-denominator expectations among watchers and listeners.

To me, the answer lies in the home. Every day at our dinner table, when our 4 kids were little, each one of them got a small spoonful of every dish served. To get dessert, each one had to eat one bite of everything on her/his plate, more of they wanted to, but no less. It usually happened, they got their dessert, and no one died from green bean poisoning. Now all four are adventuresome eaters, although each has types of food she/he does not care for as much. They were also all exposed to a wide range of music. How we have one who loves bluegrass, blues, classic rock, and plays guitar and banjo, one who leans to hip-hop and classic rock, one who focuses on jazz, fusion, complex rock, classical, and plays rock and jazz guitar and ukulele and is well on his way to becoming a master-level shakuhachi artist/performer/teacher (of which there are only 20 or 30 in the world), and one audiophile who listens to almost anything that is well recorded and - at 40 - is taking classical piano lessons. All 4 have their favorites and dislikes, but the range of variety covered by the 4 is impressive.
 

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Have todays quick cuts on tv, commercials, the internet changed the very way we look at movie scenes. Can we no longer dwell on a subject or person, do we tend to need that speed of cuts to keep us involved.
Fight sequences often follow the speed-of-cuts method. BTW, does anyone know if there's a term for this particular filming style? It's my guess that the speed-cut style is supposed to make the action seem faster, but it doesn't impress me. The style does seem to require less effort from an actor or stand-in. But what do I know? Is it harder to execute many short throws/moves for the stop-cut style, or does it take more talent to glide through extended choreography? In either case, I think talented choreographers and actors who perform their own stunts will always operate under the bigger movie budgets. The prolonged-view action scenes might contrast sharply with the speed-cut style, but I think they'll always have an appreciative audience. I think that the speed-cut style evolved from new filming technology, and that it may or may not give way to the next film tech. Regardless, it seems as if the speed-cut style hasn't replaced the prolonged-view methods and hasn't even made them look dated - other than maybe being outnumbered!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
You know Lumen, I am not sure exactly why the quick cut method has taken over but I think you are right in that it may be easier to do for the director and the actor. Lets go back in history a bit and just touch on one of my favorite movies, Raging Bull. There is talent in these fight sequences and there are quick cuts to be sure as they do make a point. However, most of the scenes dwell for long periods of time on the actors, their faces, bodies, the ring, the audience. We can look into the eyes of the boxers and know the pain, the drive, the anguish that encompasses this sport. Its brilliant. WHat about Whiplash, the blood, sweat, anger, happiness, determination and the interaction between Andrew and Fletcher is held in abeyance for all to experience....their humanity.

Just my opinion of course
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I have to agree - partially.

Neorealism - in movies, the practice of portraying the lives of the working class and poor, often on location and with non-professional actors, and with minimalist production and effects, minmal special lighting, no makeup - tends challenge a lot of viewers, and many who are used to quick cuts and glitzy presentation might not have patience for it.

OTOH, in music anyway, the heavily-produced album with non-natural effects has become an art form in its own right, I personally enjoy a well done track that can be devoid of all sense of realism.

I guess your question - can realism be appreciated by the typical modern listener / movie viewer? - gets us to look at exposure, school music programs, commonly available media sources - and ask if they are doing a disservice by focusing only on satisfying least-common-denominator expectations among watchers and listeners.

To me, the answer lies in the home. Every day at our dinner table, when our 4 kids were little, each one of them got a small spoonful of every dish served. To get dessert, each one had to eat one bite of everything on her/his plate, more of they wanted to, but no less. It usually happened, they got their dessert, and no one died from green bean poisoning. Now all four are adventuresome eaters, although each has types of food she/he does not care for as much. They were also all exposed to a wide range of music. How we have one who loves bluegrass, blues, classic rock, and plays guitar and banjo, one who leans to hip-hop and classic rock, one who focuses on jazz, fusion, complex rock, classical, and plays rock and jazz guitar and ukulele and is well on his way to becoming a master-level shakuhachi artist/performer/teacher (of which there are only 20 or 30 in the world), and one audiophile who listens to almost anything that is well recorded and - at 40 - is taking classical piano lessons. All 4 have their favorites and dislikes, but the range of variety covered by the 4 is impressive.
Thank You for this AC, it makes my heart glad to see a family that works and congratulations of your exceptional children, helped no doubt by exceptional parenting. I was a bit different in that I made the kids talk about the day, what they learned and what it means. I got free concerts every night and I was celebrated by their schools by locking them OUT of their rooms as punishment. I would make them read books to me, their choice, but it had to be a proper book. The did take a part of my musical tastes with them, but then, particularly my son, took off on another musical journey that sported more anger shall we say.
I think that quick cuts serve a purpose, but too many of them in a movie can, for me suck the humanity out of a film. HAL9000 would have not survived or taken on such a pivitol roll had we not been able to dwell on its personality and magic all seeing eye.
 

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Interesting thread Jack. Responses too. For me, I think a savvy film maker would use both, as a way to set pace, and character empathy, cutting quickly from those we don't need to invest in emotionally, subliminally creating character bias. I love the nuts and bolts of film making, and now I have more things to look at(pun?). I also agree that quick cuts and shaky cam lower the talent level required to do certain things. I does add a kind of frenetic energy that helps the illusion of being involved in the scene as a spectator. Just think if braveheart was filmed shaky/quick cut.
There was a comment earlier about humanity. I think in some ways we are dehumanizing as a society, and that style of filming is indicative of modern times to a point. Take online gaming, social media, etc. People today don't know how to interact with a real human. Kids today will share anything you can imagine, on the web, but will clam up when you ask their favorite color, or heaven forbid meet a stranger. Hope some of that Is coherent lol. I think Lou started driving that one and we shoulda toined left at albacoykee...

Oh yeah, Jack. Shaky cam sucks. Mostly....

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