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Discussion Starter · #161 ·
Gargoyles (1972)
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Gargoyles


An anthropologist/paleontologist and his daughter, while travelling through the southwestern U.S., stumble upon a colony of living, breathing gargoyles.

Director:Bill Norton (as B.W.L. Norton)
Writers:Stephen Karpf, Elinor Karpf
Stars:Cornel Wilde, Jennifer Salt, Grayson Hall

I first saw Gargoyles on the CBS Tuesday Night Movie in 1972. This unequivocably creep-ed me out when it aired on TV as a kid. Absolutely . Pretty trippy to see these creatures excellent make-up effects (the gargoyles look great). Slow-mo creature motion to make the creature suits seem incredibly "scary"; along with unnerving sound effects really has an out standing eerie effect. The Gargoyle make-up and suit holds up well today. When it comes to the topic of gargoyles, the number of films having them as a central theme is highly limited. That's part of the reason why I've always had a soft spot for this film. Along with the Nostalgia rush I got due to viewing this in my adolescence .
Primetime Emmy Awards 1973

No code has to be inserted here.

The story takes place in the American South where an anthropologist demon researcher and his daughter find the remains of a demonic creature called "Gargoyle" that has been mentioned since ancient times in the mythologies of many cultures as extremely violent and with timeless tendencies reborn every 600 years. They exist to "battle against man to gain dominion of the earth." The real problems begin when they discover that creatures are not only mythical but many of them are located and operating in the area.

The scenes inside the gargoyles' lair add some depth to the film. That makeup job is spectacular even today ; its just draws you in, you gotta watch Gargoyles for that alone. Although it is just a minor cult film, scared the hell out of me when I was a kid. It still gives chills. Gargoyles is LEGIT !

Bernie Casey in Gargoyles (1972) (as the lead Gargoyle)
Casey previously played professional football for the San Francisco 49ers from 1961-66 and the Los Angeles Rams from 1967-68.​
 

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Discussion Starter · #162 ·
The Little Princess (1939)
DVD
Stream on Amazon Prime

A little girl is left by her father in an exclusive seminary for girls, when her father fights in the Second Boer War. Later, when he is presumed dead she is forced to become a servant.

Directors:Walter Lang, William A. Seiter (uncredited)
Writers:Ethel Hill (screen play), Walter Ferris (screen play)
Stars:Shirley Temple, Richard Greene, Anita Louise

Dimpled, precocious and oh-so-adorable, Shirley Temple is, possibly, the greatest child star that ever was or ever will be. At the very least, she will certainly go down in history as the most universally popular. Between the ages of 7 and 10, she was the top box-office draw for 4 years in a row, beating out other popular actors like Clark Gable and Jean Harlow. Appearing in her breakout role in the film Stand Up and Cheer at the age of 5, she was a little girl with a near-prodigy level talent for dance, singing, and acting (she even has a tap combination named after her). Retired from acting at 21, she went on to hold several diplomatic posts in Republican administrations -- including as an ambassador to Czechoslovakia during the sudden collapse of communism in 1989. Temple remains such a symbol of innocence that kids still know the drink named for her: A sweet, non-alcoholic cocktail of ginger ale and grenadine (topped with a maraschino cherry).




If Shirley Temple does not make you smile ear to ear . Well.....You must be dead . Fabulous !!
I guarantee this Shirley Temple tap dance routine will be the best 3 minutes of your day.
Shirley & (Bojangles) Bill Robinson


The Little Princess (1939) 10/10
My Favorite Shirley Temple film. She shows her acting chops with the emotional aspects of the script. A whole new generation needs to see this classic! What a remarkable talent at such an early age. It touches a lot of emotional issues for Shirley, Mother deceased, father in the military, leaving India to fight in the Boer War which required Shirley to adjust to a new environment a boarding school in London with a great reputation but owned by a not-very-sympathetic woman. Of course Shirley meets all the problems confronting her in the best possible ways and becomes a friend of the other adults in the house, and two others nearby. Who are very supportive. The Little Princess(1939) is a wonderful Film.

The film was the first Shirley Temple movie to be filmed completely in Technicolor. It was also her last major success as a child star. After filming was completed, Daryl Zanuck of Fox requested additional scenes shot totaling $300,000 pushing the cost over $1 million. This made the movie the most expensive Shirley Temple film to date.
 

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Discussion Starter · #163 ·
A Barbary Coast saloon keeper and a Nob Hill impresario are rivals for the affections of a beautiful singer, both personally and professionally in 1906 San Francisco.

Director: W.S. Van **** (uncredited)
Writers:Anita Loos (screen play), Robert E. Hopkins (from the story by) (as Robert Hopkins)
Stars:Clark Gable, Jeanette MacDonald, Spencer Tracy

The earthquake is so magnificently done. These are still decent effects today, without any computer trickery to them. They look more realistic than many effects today because in a sense they are real - there are actual sets collapsing, buildings falling apart, a city being destroyed. Certainly for 1936, they were amazing effects. You can honestly believe that you are looking at San Francisco as it was on that fateful morning in 1906 when the earth shook and the entire city was decimated. Then came the fire, and what the earthquake hadn't destroyed, the fires took. Some 75% of the city's population was homeless by the time all the devastation had concluded. In the middle of all of this is Clark Gable, battered, beaten, with a desolate look in his eyes. He is so desperate, so haunted and he tries to keep people alive, he provides a human element to the special effects scenes.


A bloodied and battered Clark Gable on the set.



MacDonald's singing is wonderful throughout the film, but two memorable numbers deserve special mention: the rousing "San Francisco" just before the earthquake, and the beautiful performance as Marguerite in "Faust".
In a concert, we say "brava" to a female performer, not "bravo".
Brava Jeanette MacDonald

Tracy was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actor.

In addition to Tracy's acting nomination, SAN FRANCISCO was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture, Best Director (W.S. Van ****), Best Assistant Director, and Best Original Story. It won the Oscar for Best Sound. It's worth noting that an Oscar category for Best Special Effects wouldn't be created until 1939.

SAN FRANCISCO certainly exemplifies the old adage "They don't make 'em like they used to." A near-perfect package of entertainment, it features charismatic big-time movie stars in an engrossing story, which as a bonus is filled with beautiful music. And of course ; a magnificently done earthquake! 8/10

The Paradise Club collapses onto itself …

.. And the city of San Francisco follows suit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #164 ·

Mogambo (1953)


Who wouldn't be envious of Clark Gable ? The man had to choose between the affections of the stunning Grace Kelly or the delectable Ava Gardner !!!
Spoiler
Spoiler

Director:John Ford
Writers:John Lee Mahin (screenplay), Wilson Collison (play)
Stars:Clark Gable, Grace Kelly, Ava Gardner |

Victor Marswell (Clark Gable) is a big-game hunter in Kenya. After Eloise Kelly (Ava Gardner) is stood up by a friend there, she falls in with Marswell. Shortly thereafter, the Nordleys (Grace Kelly, Donald Sinden) arrive for a gorilla safari. Mrs. Nordley, disillusioned with her husband, takes a liking to Marswell, and the two have a brief affair. Kelly grows jealous, and the two women engage in a battle of wills over the hunter, while Mr. Nordley remains oblivious to it all.

In 1952, with the encroachment of middle age and his status as "King of Hollywood" no longer undisputed, Clark Gable was in sore need of a box-office smash to reaffirm his position. He received one when he signed on for the sprawling African jungle opus Mogambo (1953).

Gable and Ford had never worked together before but seemed like a good match with their similar macho temperaments. Ford had a reputation as a taskmaster and he grew increasingly impatient with the retakes necessitated by Gable's bouts with palsy. After Gable requested a retake of a complex scene with Gardner, Ford stormed off the set. In Warren G. Harris' Clark Gable (Harmony Books), producer Sam Zimbalist's advice to his furious star was recounted: "Ford's a tyrant. Do what John Wayne always does with him. When you get in there, you just say, 'Yes, coach,' and everything will be okay." Egos were sufficiently salved to get through the production civilly, but Gable and Ford would never collaborate again.
Ava Gardner turned out to be a much greater beneficiary of Ford's instruction on Mogambo. Gardner's skill as an actress was best revealed in films she made for such top directors."I have only one rule in acting," she once said, "trust the director and give him heart and soul." Gardner's gutsy, hard-boiled characterization opposite Clark Gable in Ford's Mogambo-highlighted by a memorable and hilarious scene in which she tries to feed a baby elephant and a baby rhinoceros-earned for the actress her only Academy Award nomination. Many feel Mankiewicz's The Barefoot Contessa, in which she costarred with Humphrey Bogart, to be the definitive Gardner film, in that the rags-to-riches story roughly parallels Gardner's own life.


Mogambo also marked a career boost for Grace Kelly. The MGM brass, who were unimpressed with her work in High Noon (1952), wanted Deborah Kerr for the role; Ford remained insistent and declared, as quoted in Tag Gallagher's John Ford: The Man and His Films (University of California Press): This dame has breeding, quality, class. I want to make a test of her -- in color -- I'll bet she'll knock us on our a. S. s ." Kelly delivered, of course, demonstrating for the first time the sexuality brimming beneath the cool surface that Hitchcock would bring out in films such as To Catch a Thief (1955). For her performance, Kelly received her first Academy Award nomination.
Stunning Grace Kelly in Mogambo (1953)
Mogambo was one of the first Hollywood features released without a musical soundtrack. Instead, director John Ford ordered the soundtrack filled with animal and bird sounds and native shouts that punctuated the action and set the mood.

Mogambo's $5 million domestic gross was the best first-year return that any of Ford's films ever enjoyed and Gable's career enjoyed a resurgence that would sustain the actor until his death. 7/10
 

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Discussion Starter · #165 · (Edited)
The earliest atomic tests in New Mexico cause common ants to mutate into giant man-eating monsters that threaten civilization.

Director:Gordon Douglas
Writers:Ted Sherdeman (screenplay), Russell S. Hughes (adaptation) (as Russell Hughes)
Stars:James Whitmore, Edmund Gwenn, Joan Weldon

In one of the most intriguing openings in science fiction cinema, a little girl, wandering across the desert in a state of deep shock, is spotted by two New Mexico highway troopers who take her to safety. Nearby, they discover a trailer home that has been partially demolished by some unknown force and inside there is evidence of a bloody struggle. Later, when one of the police officers is gathering evidence at another site of destruction (a ransacked country store), he hears a strange, high pitched sound coming closer and closer until he's confronted with the horrifying source - the last thing he will ever see. Meanwhile, doctors try to jolt the little girl out of her catatonic state, finally succeeding with a formic acid sample, similar to traces found at the crime scene. The child becomes wildly agitated upon smelling the odor, screaming, "THEM! - THEM!", hence the title of the film which means GIANT ANTS!
A precursor to all the giant insect movies of the fifties, Them! (1954) was also one of the first science fiction thrillers to issue a warning about the dangers of nuclear testing and radioactivity in the aftermath of the atomic bomb's creation.

Them! Had originally been conceived as a 3-D feature in color and the giant ants were given a purplish shade of green; their eyes were a soapy looking mixture of reds and blues that changed shades constantly and made them appear to be alive. Unfortunately, these effects were lost when Warner Brothers decided to release the film in black and white without the 3-D effect to save costs. Nevertheless, the film still proved to be enormously successful when released receiving favorable reviews from critics who usually dismissed horror and Sci-Fi films.


A strong cast (James Whitmore, James Arness and Edmund Gwenn), taut direction by Gordon Douglas, an intelligent and involving screenplay, and Oscar-nominated visual effects combine to make this a genuine Sci-fi classic. Them! Was Warner Brothers' highest grossing film of 1954 and inspired countless imitations. Them! Is among the best, a cautionary tale about the dangers of the atom bomb and a frightening view of nature run amok. Who doesn't love a giant ant movie? This is the perfect film to watch if you love 50's Creature Feature films. Classic Sci fi horror doesn't get much better than this. I really enjoyed this film.

List of natural horror films
(also known as creature features)
 

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Discussion Starter · #166 ·
Directors:Anthony Asquith, Leslie Howard
Writers:George Bernard Shaw (screen play and dialogue) (as Bernard Shaw), W.P. Lipscomb (scenario)
Stars:Leslie Howard, Wendy Hiller, Wilfrid Lawson
Pygmalion, written by George Bernard Shaw, based on his play, inspired by the ancient Greek myth.

Who is Pygmalion ?

Pygmalion is based on the ancient Greek myth, about the sculptor named Pygmalion who creates a statue that is so beautiful that he falls in love with it and then asks the gods to give it life and they do, therefore Galatea becomes a human being. Bernard Shaw in his famous play gives a modern interpretation of this theme. This was the first filming of a George Bernard Shaw play in which the playwright fully authorized and participated in the production. The film also was selected by the National Board of Review as one of the best films of 1938, with Wendy Hiller receiving special notice in the "Best Acting" category.

If you don't know the story, when linguistics cranky professor Henry Higgins (Leslie Howard) boasts that he can pass off Cockney flower girl Eliza Doolittle (Wendy Hiller) as a princess with only six months' training, Colonel George Pickering (Scott Sunderland) takes him up on the bet. Eliza moves into Higgins's home and begins her rigorous training after the professor comes to a financial agreement with her dustman father, Alfred (Wilfrid Lawson). But the plucky young woman is not the only one undergoing a transformation.

The movie is surprisingly cinematic, engaging and charming. Both Leslie Howard (as Professor Higgins) and Wendy Hiller (as Eliza Doolittle) present memorable and charismatic characters and the plot twists (such that they are) are funny and well-played. In this film ,it is all here; wonderful wardrobe, a taut script, romance. Snappy and witty dialog. Excellent British humor ! Pygmalion is a wonderful classic romantic comedy with a slice drama .very entertaining film. It's a shame that this film isn't more well known since it is a superb film that deserves to be more widely acknowledged as the classic it really is.

The film proved a hit in both Great Britain and the U. S. (where Henry Higgins' "damns" had to be replaced with "hangs"). At year's end, it was nominated for four Academy Awards -- including Best Picture, Best Actor (Howard) and Best Actress (Hiller) -- years before foreign films were regularly honored at the Oscars. It won the 1938 Academy Award for for Shaw's writing (Adapted Screenplay). In 1956, the material was adapted into a Broadway muscial titled My Fair Lady, which in 1964 was made into a Warner Bros. Film of the same title, starring Audrey Hepburn and Rex Harrison, and directed by George Cukor

Pygmalion has been included on The New York Times' Best 1,000 Movies Ever Made list, available here: The New York Times' Best 1,000 Movies Ever Made - Page 18

Transformation of Eliza from a Flower Girl to Duchess
 

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Discussion Starter · #167 ·

THE
UNINVITED
1944

The Criterion Collection Blu-Ray


A pair of siblings (Ministry of Fear's Ray Milland and The Philadelphia Story's Ruth Hussey) from London purchase a surprisingly affordable, lonely cliff-top house in Cornwall, only to discover that it actually carries a ghostly price; soon they're caught-up in a bizarre romantic triangle from beyond the grave.
Rich in atmosphere, the film was nominated for an Oscar. Best Cinematography, Black-and-White. The way cinematographer Charles Lang uses shadows in many scenes, sometimes so they seem to have a life of their own, also works well in helping to create the right atmosphere. The Uninvited, directed by Lewis Allen (Suddenly), was groundbreaking for the seriousness with which it treated the haunted-house genre, and it remains an elegant and eerie experience, featuring a classic score by Victor Young (gorgeous tune Stella By Starlight, which became a hit three years later). The film also introduces the young, talented Gail Russell (Stella Meredith) an incredible doe-eyed beauty who presented a screen image of great innocence and vulnerability.

A tragic family past, a mysteriously locked room, murky melodrama, revenge, scenes of seance, cold chills, bumps in the night-this Gothic Hollywood classic has it all. 8/10



There is a sad postscript to The Uninvited
Sad trivia about the beautiful Gail Russell. There is a sad postscript to The Uninvited, one that involves the young actress Gail Russell. She suffered from an intense and almost crippling stage fright which she began to combat with alcohol. The Uninvited was Ms. Russell's second movie, with her being a very shy 19-year-old girl at the time of production. To cope with her lack of confidence, she drank on the set. She didn't have trouble finding work after The Uninvited, but alcoholism had taken a firm hold of her life, to the point where she was once photographed by a paparazzi minutes after drunkenly driving her car into the front of a coffee shop in Los Angeles.In 1961, at the age of 36, she died alone in her apartment of chronic alcoholism, an extremely fatty liver and terminal aspiration of stomach contents all while surrounded by empty liquor bottles in her small studio apartment in Los Angeles, California. Sad very sad .
 

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Discussion Starter · #168 ·
Union Pacific (1939)
First Time View
There's plenty here to like. Barbara Stanwyck's excellent acting is the number one reason to seek this film out . Stanwyck especially appealing as a plucky Irish lass willing to face reality squarely in the eyes.




The director originally wanted Jean Arthur, who had starred in The Plainsman, for the female lead. Studio publicity also named Irene Dunne as a potential star (alongside Joel McCrea and Fredric March). Instead, Barbara Stanwyck took on the role. She quickly proved herself to DeMille by insisting on doing her own stunts, always arriving on set early and fully prepared and never complaining about difficult location conditions. In his memoirs, he would answer the question most Hollywood directors dread, "Who is your favorite actress?" by writing, "...I have never worked with an actress who was more co-operative, less temperamental, and a better workman, to use my term of highest compliment, than Barbara Stanwyck.... Barbara's name is the first that comes to mind, as one whom a director can always count on to do her work with all her heart".
Barbara Stanwyck

Barbara Stanwyck (born Ruby Catherine Stevens; July 16, 1907 - January 20, 1990) was an American actress, model, and dancer. A stage, film, and television star, she was known during her 60-year career as a consummate and versatile professional for her strong, realistic screen presence. A favorite of directors including Cecil B. DeMille, Fritz Lang, and Frank Capra, she made 85 films in 38 years before turning to television.

Stanwyck was well praised during her 6 decades in Hollywood. She received four Best Actress nominations. It is widely thought that Stanwyck should have won an Academy Award for Best Actress rather than being just nominated.

She received an Honorary Oscar in 1982, the Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award in 1986 and was the recipient of several other honorary lifetime awards. She was ranked as the 11th greatest female star of classic American cinema by the American Film Institute.
Stanwyck as a Ziegfeld girl in a 1924

Union Pacific (1939)
In 1862, Central Pacific and Union Pacific Railroads compete westward across the wilderness toward California.
Director:Cecil B. DeMille
Writers:Walter DeLeon (screen play), C. Gardner Sullivan (screen play) | 3 more credits »
Stars:Barbara Stanwyck, Joel McCrea, Akim Tamiroff

Veteran Dick Allen (Robert Preston) and gambler Sid Campeau (Brian Donlevy) plot to derail the construction of the Union Pacific Railroad at the behest of crooked banker Asa M. Barrows, a major investor in a competing railroad line who will profit from any delay. Meanwhile, Allen and his old friend, railroad boss Jeff Butler (Joel McCrea), compete for the attention of Mollie Monahan (Barbara Stanwyck), beautiful postmistress and daughter of the railroad engineer.
Cecil B. DeMille's sprawling, adventurous film takes on the building of the first trans-continental rail road. The actual building of the track takes second stage to the fates of three employees; Joel McCrea as the Union Pacific hired gun, Robert Preston as his war buddy working with a crooked bank man to stall the proceedings, and Barbara Stanwyck as the mail woman caught in between them for their loyalty and love. The love triangle may be contrived, but the three stars are believable. Preston conveying a surprising amount of sympathy in a colorful good/bad guy, a murderer melodramatically delivered by the love of a good woman. DeMille keeps the 140 minutes moving with exciting action, some wonderful set pieces, two or three exciting finales -- robberies, a train wreck and an enthralling Indian attack. The tale is well-directed, and the cinematography is splendid. The special effects are impressive. The film was nominated for an Oscar for Best Special Effects.


In reading about its premier I learned some fascinating trivia !

"The biggest premiere in movie history."
Apr 1939 Hollywood Reporter news items reported that Union Pacific's world premiere in Omaha, Nebraska was a gala "three-day celebration" that drew crowds of over 250,000, instantly doubling the city's population and requiring the deployment of eight national guard troops to help local authorities maintain order. Large crowds were also said to have gathered at many stops along the train route from Hollywood to Omaha, as it was publicized that a special train carrying, among others, producer and director Cecil B. De Mille, and stars Barbara Stanwyck and Joel McCrea, was making its way to Nebraska for the event. The film's premiere took place at three Omaha theaters simultaneously. A 22 Apr 1939 HR news item noted that President Franklin Delano Roosevelt was to officially start the premiere proceedings by pressing a button in Washington, D. C. that would open Omaha's civic auditorium. An advertisement in HR claimed that Union Pacific's premiere, which was accompanied by parades, special radio broadcasts and a banquet, was the "biggest world premiere in motion picture history." The ad also notes that following the premiere, De Mille was joined by many of the film's stars aboard an antique train for the continuation of the fifteen-day, coast-to-coast promotional tour, which was scheduled to stop at thirty cities around the country. Now how awesome this adventure would have been to be apart of for the lover of cinema !
Kino Lorber will bring to Blu-ray Cecil B. DeMille's Union Pacific (1939), starring Barbara Stanwyck, Joel McCrea, Akim Tamiroff, Robert Preston, and Lynne Overman. The release is expected to arrive on the market during the summer 2021.
No code has to be inserted here.
Kino Lorber | 1939 | 135 min | Not rated | Summer 2021
 

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Discussion Starter · #169 ·

LGT WORLD WOMEN’S CURLING CHAMPIONSHIP 2021
I'll keep my sports viewing to a minimum on this thread, though I thought this was noteworthy. It's a rare sport to find outside of Olympic ice. You can watch it on Olympic Channel or Peacock streaming.

Calgary, Canada 30 April 2021 - 9 May 2021
The LGT World Women’s Curling Championship 2021 is for 14 women’s teams from the World Curling Federation’s Americas, European and Pacific-Asia zones and is where six teams earn qualification for the Beijing 2022 Olympic Winter Games.



Vicky Wright Scottish curler

While curling may be a winter sport, these athletes sizzle.

Who knew?
Spoiler

Canadian superstar Cheryl Bernard.
Spoiler

Jennifer Jones - Canada


Ekaterina Galkina - Russia


Anna Sidorova - Russia
Spoiler



 

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Discussion Starter · #170 ·
Wuthering Heights (1939)
Included with Prime Video
First Time View

A servant in the house of Wuthering Heights tells a traveler the unfortunate tale of lovers Cathy and Heathcliff.

Director:William Wyler
Writers:Charles MacArthur (screen play), Ben Hecht (screen play)
Stars:Merle Oberon, Laurence Olivier, David Niven


A dark and sullen adaptation of Emily Bronte's novel about the doomed love affair of brooding gypsy Heathcliff (Olivier) and the passionate, self-absorbed Cathy (Oberon). The story is wonderfully melodramatic , and very artistically successful. The film score by Alfred Newman is impeccable. The music sets up the atmosphere through the entire film splendidly. The film score is one of the highlights of the film. The monochrome cinematography was incredible. Wuthering Heights was nominated for 8 Oscars winning for best black and white cinematography. Its ranking of #73 on the AFI top 100 films of all time seems appropriate.
Tragic and haunting storytelling acted by classic movie stars. The dialogue is more formal, enunciation is more pronounced, actors from this era came from theater. Acting for the stage had been tweaked and perfected for centuries at the advent of film, whereas, obviously, acting for film was a new concept. Films from the 1930s just have such a unique style of days gone by that I just absolutely relish .
Trivia :

Goldwyn sent a film crew to northern England for images of the Yorkshire moors to help the designers recreate the story's setting.

About 500 acres of the hills were stripped of their natural vegetation, and 15,000 pieces of tumbleweed were brought in and topped with purple-painted sawdust to resemble heather.

About 1,000 genuine heather plants were brought in for close-ups. In the southern California sunshine, the plants grew much taller than they ever would on the moors.

More than once, Oberon was reduced to tears by Wyler's methods. When Cathy had to run out onto the moors in a fierce storm to stop Heathcliff from leaving, Wyler ordered the actress over and over into propeller-driven winds and rain. After many takes, she began to choke and vomit. She ran a fever and had to be confined to a hospital bed, costing the production thousands of dollars. She refused to do the scene again until Goldwyn rigged heaters to warm the driving rain.

In one scene, Wyler insisted Niven break down. When Niven told him his contract said he would never have to cry on camera, Wyler didn't believe him. Niven got the contract the "no crying" clause was in there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #171 ·
Director:Phillip Noyce
Writers:Jeffery Deaver (book), Jeremy Iacone (screenplay)
Stars:Denzel Washington, Angelina Jolie, Queen Latifah

A diabolical killer whose brutal slayings leave a trail of cryptic messages hidden at the scene of the crime is loose on the streets of Manhattan. As the city lies in fear, a gifted but disabled detective (Washington) teams with a rookie street cop (Jolie) to go inside the mind of this terrifying madman and defeat him at his own game.

Adapted from Jeffrey Deaver's novel, The Bone Collector is a Seven -like thriller , a little morbid, and a bit grisly a psychotic that leaves his victims dead and without their bones. The intriguing element is the fact that the hero, like James Stewart in Rear Window, is confined to bed and has to use someone else to do the legwork, literally.


Washington and Jolie are very good here. Jolie gets some background characterization, which helps explain her bitterness, and it takes her a while to warm up to Washington. Washington is also good in a physically limited role, using his facial expressions to relate to the audience. Phillip Noyce does an excellent job of direction and works brilliantly with cinematographer to create an eerie mood , and most audiences will be on the edges of their seats as the climax draws near. A thriller that also manages to focus on the art of mentoring. This film is a very entertaining psychological thriller .
 

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Sorry, no pictures but Smithsonian Channel, Air Disasters. Curiosity Stream, Secrets of the solar system and other tech documentaries. Net flex, Blacklist.
 

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Discussion Starter · #173 ·
Director:Martin Scorsese
Writers:Martin Scorsese (screenplay), Mardik Martin (screenplay)
Stars:Robert De Niro, Harvey Keitel, David Proval ,Amy Robinson

A slice of street life in Little Italy among lower echelon Mafioso's, unbalanced punks, and petty criminals. A small-time hood gets in over his head with a vicious loan shark. In an attempt to free himself from the dangers of his debt, he gets help from a friend who is also involved in criminal activities.

Scorsese's arrival as an important cinematic voice and features electrifying performances from Harvey Keitel and Robert De Niro. Gritty, violent Scorsese classic.

If you enjoy the music of the 60s and early 70s, extremely cool cars, wild clothing and serious attitudes from Guidos ( a man, especially an Italian American, regarded as vain, aggressively masculine, and socially unsophisticated.) you will find nothing better then what Scorsese has to offer in this time capsule of the 70s on the streets of Little Italy, Manhattan. A classic in realism.

Robert De Niro in Mean Streets (1973)

Jumpin' Jack Flash


'Jumpin' Jack Flash' – Mean Streets
This would be the start of a lifelong friendship between De Niro and Scorsese as well as unofficial collaboration between the Stones and the young filmmaker.
De Niro's entrance
 

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Discussion Starter · #174 · (Edited)
A reporter finds what appears to be a cover-up of safety hazards at a nuclear power plant.

Director:James Bridges
Writers:Mike Gray, T.S. Cook
Stars:Jane Fonda, Jack Lemmon, Michael Douglas


The film is a class-act thriller, an extremely efficient example of emotional manipulation. With Jane Fonda heading the cast and ultimately, Lemmon's performance is what makes The China Syndrome work.Jack Lemmon is brilliant . A terrific film .

BAFTA Awards 1980
Winner BAFTA Film Award Best Actor: Jack Lemmon
Winner BAFTA Film Award Best Actress: Jane Fonda

Why do they call it the China Syndrome?

"China syndrome", a nuclear meltdown scenario so named for the fanciful idea that there would be nothing to stop the meltdown tunneling its way to the other side of the world ("China")


 
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