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Elite Shackster
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I guess a single sealed cabinet with a standard mid driver and tweeter arrangement. You could try loosing the tweeter for ultimate simplicity, but I wouldnt myself, even though the mains I am using at the minute dont sound to bad without tweeters.
 

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Elite Shackster
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There are better placed people than myself to help with design specifics who will hopefully be along shortly to help. I have to say though, I've always been impressed with ribbon tweeters, and using one of those is a long way from a bad idea.
 

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For ribbon tweeters + easy you could look at the foutek kit at madisound as a good starting venture into DIY since the crossovers are assembled and included. Plus it has the ribbon tweeters you were interested in.

http://www.madisound.com/catalog/advanced_search_result.php?keywords=RM6K

In general for easy I'd look at prepacked kits at madisound parts express etc that include cabinets prerouted baffle, and assembled crossovers.

I'm not sure of the dificulty level but statement and mini statement speakers are also DIY ribbon tweeter designs.

Good luck
Jay
 

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The easiest DIY's I know are kits that include pre-made boxes and assembled crossovers; you can even get pre-cut baffles (front panel that mounts speakers, frequently recessed flush). Truly "some assembly required" but that's all.

As buggers said, we need more info.
- Can you solder? Can you assemble simple electrronic circuits from parts and a drawing?
- Can you build boxes? What power tools do you have, like table saws and routers?

If yes to both, you can build any of the DIY designs listed in the links shown here:
http://techtalk.parts-express.com/showthread.php?t=211558

If not, you should look at the semi-commercial to commercial links (eg. not forums) to find kits that come with assembled crossovers, and kits that also come with assembled enclosures. You'll also find amateur designs intended for commercially available enclosures, if only soldering was a yes.

Needless to say, the rest of buggers questions are also of interest if you want us to be more specific.

Have fun,
Frank
 

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The easiest DIY's I know are kits that include pre-made boxes and assembled crossovers; you can even get pre-cut baffles (front panel that mounts speakers, frequently recessed flush). Truly "some assembly required" but that's all.

As buggers said, we need more info.
- Can you solder? Can you assemble simple electrronic circuits from parts and a drawing?
- Can you build boxes? What power tools do you have, like table saws and routers?

If yes to both, you can build any of the DIY designs listed in the links shown here:
http://techtalk.parts-express.com/showthread.php?t=211558

If not, you should look at the semi-commercial to commercial links (eg. not forums) to find kits that come with assembled crossovers, and kits that also come with assembled enclosures. You'll also find amateur designs intended for commercially available enclosures, if only soldering was a yes.

Needless to say, the rest of buggers questions are also of interest if you want us to be more specific.

Have fun,
Frank
There is the tool cost for sure. For the sawing a circular saw can be used. Takes more setup than a table saw though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I think I might plan on building the Jim Holtz mini statements, I am not good with electronics, so I plan on looking at another person's crossovers that I have seen someone else used, then I might decide to buy a router, and saw.
I would go for the Original Statements but they seem more complicated then the mini's.

I also have one more question, whats the best place to get some clamps?

I have heard really great things about the mini statements, so do they live up to the hype?

Right now I only have energy RC-10, with a Denon 590 and a Energy S8.3.
My budget is maybe under $800

So I really have no tools right now but those aren't included in the budget either.
So how hard is the mini statements?
 

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A couple comments, none of which are intended as criticism of the Mini Statements

Mini Statements aren't mini, except compared with the Statements. You're starting with a high-end 3-way in a big tower enclosure. This is not a beginner's project, especially for someone without a woodshop.

Mini Statements use the same RS180 driver complement as the Modula MTM/Natalile P, but with a roughly $150/pair premium for the 3-way drivers and XO parts. That premium, in turn, is roughly the cost of one pre-finished, curve-side 1 cu ft enclosure from PE. For ~$700, you can make either of these MTMs and the only power tool you need is a router with circle jig for the driver cut outs.

With the same bass drivers, a 3-way will play a little bit louder, and a 3-way division of the frequency range will improve sound quality somewhat. I don't think you'll be able to hear either of these advantages initially unless you're sonically gifted.

It comes down to your goals. If you want to set up a woodworking shop, Mini Statements would be a great excuse, but only if you plan to take up woodworking. If you'd like to try building your own, but with minimal tools and a guaranteed pretty box, it's hard to beat an MTM in the PE boxes. The best part is that's how the build guide is structured, down to taping over the face to preserve the finish when routing for the drivers.

Regardless, just be sure to...

Have fun,
Frank
 

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I think I might plan on building the Jim Holtz mini statements, I am not good with electronics, so I plan on looking at another person's crossovers that I have seen someone else used, then I might decide to buy a router, and saw.
I would go for the Original Statements but they seem more complicated then the mini's.

I also have one more question, whats the best place to get some clamps?

I have heard really great things about the mini statements, so do they live up to the hype?

Right now I only have energy RC-10, with a Denon 590 and a Energy S8.3.
My budget is maybe under $800

So I really have no tools right now but those aren't included in the budget either.
So how hard is the mini statements?
If you have not built anything like this before I would highly recommend doing a small trial build, maybe do a cheap bookshelf you can put in your office or something. Everyone makes mistakes on their first build and some are not very easy to correct. If you are very confident in your planning and woodworking abilities by all means go for it, I would just really hate to see you make a significant investment in these amazing speakers and it not turn out exactly how you had hoped it would.

As for clamps, I am a big fan of harbor freight if you have one nearby.
 

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The Zaph Audio SR71 is a highly regarded 2way that's also available from Madisound with ready made crossovers and pre-cut baffles.....nice for a first project and sound quality is unparalled DIY at the price point. The Seas reed cone woofer has class leading distortion and the tweeter is a DIY staple for many designs. Take a look....

http://zaphaudio.com/SR71.html

John's and excellent designer and i know from experience. I've built a few of his designs and they've always exceeded my expectations. Lot's of the top DIY designers are working with the woofer used in the SR71 as it's IMO the best $$$ for performance 7" woofer available.
 

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The SR71 is an excellent design with many happy owners, and there are undeniable advantages to pre-made (custom) XOs and pre-cut baffles. It's also smaller (0.5 cu ft) and less expensive ($630 with no power tools needed).

The downside is that 2 woofers can take more power and play noticably louder than one. In this case, the RS-series are also low distortion drivers, and the XO designs do an excellent job so there is no downside besides added the cost, and larger, 1 cu ft box.

If you'd like to start with something challenging and satisfying, and not buy tools, Parts Express offers a Tritrix MTM kit, with pre-cut MDF enclosure for $200/pair. You still solder a simple XO and have to glue and paint the box (unless you like the cardboard look). The Tritrix series includes CC and TM configurations, and while it may be a bit more sensitive, it won't play as loud or as clean as the more expensive designs. It will also only look as nice as you have skill and patience to make it so, while the others will look professionally made.

"Lunchmoney" on the PE forum has both Tritrix and SR71, and is happy with both! You really can't lose with either of these, or the NatPs, but you should understand the tradeoffs.

HAve fun,
Frank
 
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