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Hi everyone,

My living-room has hardwood floors and right now I have my speakers sitting on the floor without the spikes as they cause damage to the floor (not ideal). Is there a good alternative to this, are there ways to still use some sort of spike that does not dig into the hardwood? And where would one buy these (keep in mind I live in Canada so shipping may be an issue for some places).

Thanks
 

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What about rubber feet? I don't know if they would damage the floor or not, but, if not, they would at least give some isolation. Dennis
 

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I see some feet that simply go under the spikes but they dont seem very well made and usually go for more than I want to pay on eBay. Would rubber work as in do the proper job?
 

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When I bought my PSB speakers, I am pretty sure they came with a set of spikes for use on carpet AND a set of dense rubber nubs for use on hardwood. I don't know where to get them, but I would assume dense rubber nubs would be the way to go. I checked Parts Express for you and they only seem to have spikes or big cabinet feet.
 

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These should be easy to find but the only place I have found anything was at a high end shop that charges way to much $65 for 4 feet :unbelievable:.
 

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Same thing with my RBH speakers. The feet came with spikes that screw into the feet and are adjustable, they also came with a set of spikes that have a rubber end rather than the point.

Another option would be to use your current spikes but place a rubber cabinet foot like this underneath the spikes or brass floor pads like these. Either would be an inexpensive solution ($4 - $8).
 

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I agree the above. Skip trying to by over priced dedicated speaker feet and make a trip to your local home improvement store. Foot pads for furniture or even raw material that you cut your self will work. This stuff should be supper cheap, so try a few different materials and see what you like best.

My room is carpeted, but I'm considering hardwood floors, so interested to hear what works...
 

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I'm thinking the same thing. Your right that spending alot is foolish. I do like the idea of using simple furniture feet. I will have a look the next time I'm at Home Depot.
 

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Don't pay high dollars for spike pads...I use either a quarter or nickel. Works perfect, of course I am using 12 quarters. Gold one dollars would be "High End" quality stuff :)
 

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Tony your in Edmonton home of the Oilers so I know you can get your hands on some pucks. I used them for a while when I couldn't remember where I placed the rubber feet for my speakers.
 

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I've tried hockey pucks and spikes. Although hockey pucks don't look as good as spikes they seem to work well.

I went back to spikes with nickels under them to protect my hardwood floors. The spikes were punching holes in pennies.

IMO spikes work better.
 

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I have dealt with these guys before when getting spikes for my diy speaker stands they are somewhat cheap they have the dishes that go under the spiks for $1.35 each.
http://www.oregondv.com/Brass Floor Pads.htm
I don't know if anyone has dealt with them before, but it was a good experience for me.
These are what I use, although I got them on ebay and spent just a little more. They have been protecting my floor for years.
 

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Just to clarify, spiking the speaker to the floor does isolate the speaker from floor borne vibrations. The vibrations have a hard time transferring their energies up though such a small surface area with hundreds of pounds per square inch pushing down.

Spikes also help the speaker to drain cabinet energy away and into the floor. If the floor is concrete or stone, rubber bump-ons would be preferred to keep the speaker from chattering on the hard surface.

My subs sit on rubber bump-ons, my stands on spikes (suspended wood floor). YMMV, it is best to experiment, because what works in one room does not always work in another. Maybe you don't want to transfer cabinet energy to the floor in your environment. :ponder:
 
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