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Discussion Starter #1
I just ordered a spare lamp assembly for my IN72 at a cost of $340, which is actually a deal compared to the standard cost of $399. My original lamp has about 2700 hours on it and with a life expectancy of 3000 I though it would be wise to be ready for the inevitable granted that some owners have reported going well beyond 3000. Thus the query of why are lamps so expensive? One would think by now that manufacturers have streamlined the process.

This also leads to my next point. I read that some people had sources that could provide the actual bulb at a fraction of the cost of a new lamp. I believe it was around $150. This seemed like a viable option for anyone who wanted to take apart the existing lamp assembly and repair it, but it really has not been explored in depth.

I realize that Samsung is already making rear projection sets with LED lamp engines that are said to be good in excess of 10000 hour which means others will follow suit and I expect it to reach front projection as well. I was just wondering if anyone wanted to weigh in on this?

I mean I could go with an LCD or Plasma, but you can't find one that will give a screen above 65" without getting into the ten thousand dollar range. Also, I like the feel of the front projection because it makes you seem like you are in the theater.
 

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The DIY solution is to find the original lamp from the least expensive supplier, usually without the cage. There are several places to find cross reference info and more vendors are supplying the lamps all the time. Some can be found, some cannot without going to the maker of the display.

Try some of the vendors here:

http://www.hometheatershack.com/forums/manufacturer-vendor-reference-information/4396-parts-distributors.html

another to check

http://www.intl-lighttech.com/tvlamps


Just be sure that you are getting the same lamp, not a sub or replacement made by a different vendor, unless you can confirm compatability with no doubt.
 

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Hi, I will soon be running into the same issue with my IN76, and I'll do a bit of searching myself in this regard. I'll be interested in anything you can find out as well.

On a side note, the Infocus products are great for having an absolutely unknown port on the back called an M1-DA. I love the blank stares I get from the Geek Squad at Best Buy trying to find a cable. Anyhow, as a Infocus projector owner I thought you would feel my pain. :thud:

Good luck on the lamp search.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Well, the lamp for the IN76 is the same as the IN72. I mean, I'm good at taking things apart and putting them back together, so I'd definitely give it a go. I will save the assembly to my original lamp once it goes dead and try to find further information.
 

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I wouldn't recommend DIYing a projector replacement bulb. Projector lamps are usually under extremely high pressure so be extra careful handling one that doesn't have a cage on it. If it were to explode (old one or new) it could send glass and metal fragments everywhere (wear safety glasses :nerd:). The gasses inside the bulb wouldn't be too healthy for you either (mercury). Failing to get the right bulb and assemble it correctly could cause it to explode within the projector also, which wouldn't be good. There is a reason why they are so expensive (other than corporate greed).
 

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While caution is prudent, these are not so hard to handle. The main thing is to be sure not to get any oils or debris on the glass and to make sure the fit is correct. Make sure that the lamp is the OEM lamp. People change the lamps all the time, with no problems.
 

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I wouldn't DIY an FP replacement bulb as well, but some people have the necessary skills and knowledge, otherwise I wouldn't recommend so.
 

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Bulbs are pricey because the market is still small compared to others so they need to generate income somehow.......just good business.
 

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The main reason that the lamps are so expensive is the precision with which they have to be made to get the right mix of light output and color spectrum, while lasting thousands of hours at relatively high output.

While I would not recommend just anyone swap lamps, there really is not much to it. The level of DIY skill at HTS is pretty high and most members here wold have no problem with the process. You handle mercury containing flourescent tubes which are more likely to break and have more in them than a projector lamp. Far more dangerous. The big risk in changing a lamp is contaminants that cook from the heat causing early failure. Just wear some gloves and it is not a big deal. What is a big deal is buying the right lamp. Many more people create problems for themselves by buying replacement lamps that are not actually OEM lamps than have problems swapping them in the housing.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Agreed on many points. That's why I wanted to find a DIY solution. I was an electronics technician for many years and would take on the task, the problem is finding an OEM replacement bulb. In my case, I need an IN72 bulb. I'd give it a go.

The next logical question is when will we see LED based lamps for front projectors?
 

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has anyone tried Converting from LAMP over to HID ?? ( instead of LED )

instead of paying out $400 every 3000 hrs when a 100 watt LAMP dies
I am thinking of trying to throw in an 50w HID

the HID's are 1/20th the price and around the same brightness and last 10x longer

any thoughts on this ?

I figured you can get HID tourches pretty cheaply also and they do pump out the candle power ,,,
make inside the enclosure a little more reflective and it should help even out the brightness levels
( maybe bounce around on some mirrors ? )
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Actually, I have moved on from Front Projection. PDP's have come way down so I went with a 65" for $2400. I sold my trusty old IN72 over a year ago for $500 and had replaced that with a Mitsubishi HC6500, which was awesome but I have that sale pending for around $2000 installed. The costs offset my plasma and I don't have to deal with keeping the room dark or counting lamp hours anymore.
 

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Well I am not a electronic technician nor do I have any specials skills in the area but to change out a lamp by replaceing the bulb only in most cases is not difficult at all. I have done it a few times now and while you need to be carefull and do as suggested, wear gloves and be carefull to get the correct bulb, it is not a hard thing to do. Some cages are harder to get apart and some may be impossible without breaking them but most don't fall into that category so if you take your time and use precautions it is the best way to save some money.
 

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has anyone tried Converting from LAMP over to HID ?? ( instead of LED )

instead of paying out $400 every 3000 hrs when a 100 watt LAMP dies
I am thinking of trying to throw in an 50w HID

the HID's are 1/20th the price and around the same brightness and last 10x longer

any thoughts on this ?

I figured you can get HID tourches pretty cheaply also and they do pump out the candle power ,,,
make inside the enclosure a little more reflective and it should help even out the brightness levels
( maybe bounce around on some mirrors ? )
The spectrum will be different, and there are a number of other engineering considerations that would need to be dealt with before making the decision as to whether the trade-off is worthwhile. The lower output alone would be enough to make it uninteresting to me, even if the spectral issues were not severe.
 

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Most projector lamps are Metal Halide and are high intensity discharge (HID). They are typically very bright and were made to be color neutral to give the best movie watching experience. They are also typically in and around 200 Watts.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metal_halide_lamp

Using a lower wattage, non purpose built bulb would not have a very good outcome. It would most like blow out very quickly and/or damage the ballast. Figure the ballast is going to fire at the same rate with the same intensity.

LED is the bright future, considering the bulbs will, most likely, outlast the projector.
 
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