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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Newbie here trying to get an idea of the DIY thought process. I have searched the forum but really don't have a clear answer. So here is my thinking.

If you are building your sub box from scratch why use a plate amp rather than an external amp? Do you need the weight? Seems you have much more flexibility with an external amp and keep items separate.

Besides, plate do not seem all that much cheaper than a decent PA amp watt for watt. If and when that plate amp dies you most likely will have to replace it with the exact same model. Why not get an external amp that could possibly run another sub down the road?

But if you cant tell I am at that point now. Plate amp died I am thinking of getting future sub power from external sources.

Thanks in advance,

Dave
 

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Biggest advantage to plate amps is 'simplicity', having a few features built in. That's my best guess. I like them for that reason, and not having to worry about level matching with PA amps. It's more "plug n' play". But I agree with you; they may not be the best choice long term. I just had to replace a dead plate amp in a sonotube I made years ago, which had a custom mounting cut into the tube. But I managed, and it wasn't too painful.

So I guess they both have their advantages/disadvantages. For my IB, I actually use a plate amp that I mounted into my wall. Maybe I'd jump into PA amps if I ever needed huge power, but I doubt I'll ever want that. I may be tempted if the PA amps continue to integrate some DSP, like we've started to see.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Good points. It is simpler and more plug & play. From what I gather constant upgrade of gear is a common sickness on this forum. Maybe I am at the onset with this urge to move to separate components.
 

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I guess plate amps could be considered more plug'n'play, but not by much. I don't own a rack amp *yet*, but will be purchasing an iNUKE 3000DSP this week.
From all the research I've done, and comparing prices, it just didn't make sense to buy a plate amp. Rack amps offer so much more flexibility over plate amps that, to me, I just couldn't justify the purchase of a plate amp.
Even if you were to buy a rack amp without built in DSP, like the Behringer EP4000, you would only need a miniDSP hooked up and it doesn't get much easier than that from an EQ stand point.
 

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I guess plate amps could be considered more plug'n'play, but not by much. I don't own a rack amp *yet*, but will be purchasing an iNUKE 3000DSP this week.
From all the research I've done, and comparing prices, it just didn't make sense to buy a plate amp. Rack amps offer so much more flexibility over plate amps that, to me, I just couldn't justify the purchase of a plate amp.
Even if you were to buy a rack amp without built in DSP, like the Behringer EP4000, you would only need a miniDSP hooked up and it doesn't get much easier than that from an EQ stand point.
Having used both, i would say the plate is used as less space is needed , much more simpler. You can also use the dsp with the plate amp. However, alot of the time the plate amps have built in settings, or highpass filters.

The dsp in the inuke is pretty good, i like being able to adjust it with usb and save the settings on the computer. You will prolly need to mod the inuke, as the stock fan is pretty noisy. Im trying to get rid of one at the moment, just havent listed it. No clue what they go for used?
 

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As mentioned above, a plate amp makes a compact design with no need for external high pass filters and can usual be matched, power-wise, with the selected driver.
Using external components take up more room but offers more flexibility. You can add more filters to suit the room and purchase a larger amp with the intention of upgrading or adding to your sub(s)
 
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