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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I acquired a Mitsu WS-55807 from a friend who was going to throw it away. It had some minor screen burn in and had issues with image convergence. The burn in was barely visible and after poking around inside the TV and some research, I was able to fix the convergence issue by replacing the convergence amplifiers. For basically $20, I was able to get a 55" High Def TV with great picture quality(Once I fixed the factory settings) :T

I then tried hooking up a computer through the component inputs using an ATI HD breakout cable. It worked fairly well, but the best resolution I have been able to get was 854X640 which works well for DVD and Blu Ray playback, but not so well for Netflix which requires I browse the internet. The resolution makes it hard to work in a web browser.

Long long story short, I was playing with monitor timings and settings with a DVI monitor attached to my media pc in addition to the Mitsu. For whatever reason, Windows set the DVI monitor as the primary when I originally booted with the Mitsu TV set as secondary. I had The Mitsu set at 854x640 and the DVI monitor was set to 1024x768. I wasn't able to coax any better resolution out of the Mitsu than the 854x640 and assumed that was the limit of the 480p component inputs. I then made the Mitsu the primary monitor.

When I hit apply, the Mitsu came up with a screen resolution of 1024x768 :yikes:

Not only did the Mitsu come up in 1024x768, but I was then able to increase the resolution to 1280x800. There was a bit of overscan so that the desktop of the computer extended about 5% on each side, past the viewable area of the TV, but that's merely a timing issue.

What surprised me is that I didn't think I could get much more than a 854x640 resolution over component video. My question is this: Is it safe to run my Mitsu at 1280x 800, or is that the equivalent of overclocking a CPU and beyond what the capabilities of the TV technically are?
 

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If it is stable and works, there should be no problem. What resolution does the Mits display if you bring up the OSD on the set? There are only two scan rates for this set, IIRC, 480p or 1080i.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
it's 480p. I'm using one of the three wire component video inputs. I think the 1080i input is broken as I am unable to get a picture using any cable I have available to me including the three wire component I am using now, and a VGA to RGBHV breakout cable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
New development:

I discovered that my ATI video card was actually compressing the image before it was sent to the TV. The TV still is displaying the same number of horizontal and vertical lines, but as I scale the resolution up, the image becomes fuzzier and harder to read.

I am also now able to get a picture via my DTV input using an ATI component breakout cable when the DTV input is set to YbBpR. I still am unable to get an image via my VGA to RGBHV breakout cable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I was poking around inside my TV to see if I could get the part number off of the HD input board to see if I could find a replacement. I noticed that there was a cable connector on the top of the board that had no wires connected to it. I searched around inside the TV and found a loose cable connected on one end but not the other that perfectly fit into the connector on the HD board.

I fired up the TV and turned on my HTPC. The TV flashed a few times and there was an almost crystal clear image of my windows 7 desktop. The over scan was awful, but it was certainly much better than I had seen before. I hit the "Info" button on my remote and sure enough, it said "1080i Standard."

When I got the TV, I was told that even if I fixed it, the HD input didn't work. I am wondering if this entire time, the issue preventing the TV from displaying 1080i was that disconnected internal cable.
 

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Hello, I've had a 55807, since it's birth. It's having an intermittent serious deflection problem as well. The red deflection was repaired under warranty. I guess this one's on me.
Anyway, I've been trying to get a PC to run through my Mits. since I bought it in 2000, not terribly aggressively though. I've been using the Mits. with the RCA DCT-100 DirectTV HD VGA connector.
I'm guessing the BreakOut Cable is the same as the ATI BOC mentioned above. I have a new Win 7 box with an ATI video card. It doesn't have a VGA output, just HDMI and DVI(with a VGA adapter)
Is the adapter messing me up? Do I need a different card? What would be the best card to get, or at least under $500?
One odd bit is that I can see text on the Mits, as the PC boots, but a blue screen(no signal/sync) after booting. I wish my Inspiron Laptop would have worked, the NVidia control panel looks like it should be able to set it up, but the Mits. display is "unrecognized"
Thanks
 

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Thanks, I was hoping to hear from firesyde424. He mentioned earlier attaining 1080i. I'd be happy with a video card recommendation, since my ATI with HDMI and DVI doesn't work with the VGA adapter.
Regards, M.
 

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Thanks again, but I'm still interested in finding a PC video card that can drive my set to 1080i, as firesyde424 has. Sorry for being inaccurate on the signal/connector technology that my RCA DCT-100 DirectTV HD tuner uses to send an RGBHV 1080i signal to my set. I think it's a 15 pin connector, used for many monitor formats. My set also shows 1080i with the YPrPb component signal from by blu-ray player.
 

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Your set will do 1080i over the RGBHV connections from a VGA output only if you have a card that can configure the timing, levels, and sync correctly. I am not sure that there are any current ones that can. Most modern video cards that have analog HD video timings will output them as component rather than discrete RGBHV. The RCA was one of the few devices ever set up to do so. This was very early in the HD era and there was not yet certainty about how signals would typically be delivered.

Any card that does component HD out can drive your set (at least for 1080i). You need to set the RGB inputs to component rather than discrete RGBHV.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Before you read below, make sure that your Mitsu has the HD Board upgrade. If my research is correct, not all of the WS-55807 models, especially the earlier production models, came with the capability to receive a 1080i signal and needed a separate circuit board upgrade which was not available when the model first went on sale. If your Mitsu has an input that will accept a red, green, and blue tinted cable, and specifically lists 1080i as one of its input modes, then chances are that your TV will display the 1080i picture.

I used what was termed on the package as an "HD Breakout" cable that came packaged with the video card. I couldn't find an exact picture of it, but the link below contains a picture of one that is close.

http://www.pccables.com/01779.html

My cable only had the three YPrPb Component RCA outputs. It connected to the video card using a circular port on the back of the video card that looked like an Svideo connector but actually had 9 pins instead of four.

Make sure to set the "DTV" input to YPrPb(I think that's the right spelling) using the input settings in the setup menu of the TV. If my spelling of YPrPb is not in your list, pick whatever option is not "RGB."(There should only be two).

Connect the component outputs from the breakout cable to the proper inputs on the back of the TV. They are color coded so it should be pretty easy to find the correct inputs. I know it says in the manual to use some expensive "premium" cables but I did not have any issues using standard, cheap, RCA cables. Next, make sure the computer is on and the TV is off. Turn the TV on and if you have a new enough video card, your computer should detect the TV and automatically configure the settings for you . If not, you will need to manually set the video card to 1920 x 1080. It helps to have a computer monitor connected just in case the TV doesn't work the first time.

There are some limitations to using this method. Since component connections are not digital and therefore not compatible with the various DRM schemes found on blu-ray movies, there is currently no legal method that I am aware of that will allow you to watch blu-ray movies on the WS-55807(or any Mitsu TV from the early 2000's.) Additionally, depending on the age of your particular TV, you will likely experience a great deal of over scan. This can be partially fixed using the ATI Catalyst configuration tool to change frequency timings ect... Unfortunately, despite a great deal of tinkering, I was never able to completely compensate for the overs can.

I'm sorry if some of that is a bit vague. I found a good deal on a used, four year old, 50" Sony DLP TV about six months ago and I gave my Mitsu WS-55807 to a friend.

If you have any more questions, post here and I'll try to answer them as best I can
 

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All 55807s could do 1080i. The external tuner unit was not needed if you have the right connections and you configure the inputs properly. The RGBHV inputs can be configured for discrete RGB or for component, ignoring the HV inputs. The external unit was an OTA tuner. Virtually none of them were sold and they have not been available for years. The RCA DTC100 was one of the few units to use discrete RGBHV for HD video. The mits tuner was another. The sync and blanking timings are very critical on these sets and they can be very fussy about getting the right signal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
It's entirely possible that I am not using the correct term or that I have my models mixed up. I remember reading something in the user manual about an HD Board upgrade being required for the 1080i to function. I would have to go back and look, but it's possible I have it mixed up with something else.

As far as the timings go, I had to tinker with the settings on my older Radeon(1500 pro I think it was) using a program called Powerstrip before it would work at all. I upgraded to a Radeon 3000 series and a newer computer shortly after that and the only tinkering I had to do was in relation to the over scan. It's been long enough, I don't reliably remember what the timings were. I ended up doing a google search when I first tried setting this all up and I was able to find several websites that listed various timings for the Mitsu WS-55807 which helped immensely and served as a very useful starting point.
 

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It is likely that you would have to tweak with the timings and Powerstrip is a common application that was used successfully for this. I am not aware of any additional boards for the 55807. There are additional features on other sets in that chassis series, but they all do 480i, 480p, and 1080i on the DTV inputs if you have the right signal and the right configuration on the inputs. The sets were not very tolerant of deviations from standard timings, however.
 
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