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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I am considering getting a Xilica XP-2040 for use as an active crossover. I see some folks on the board have experience with their products used an as EQ, but couldn't find any threads regarding use as crossovers. Anyone used their products in this role before?
Also any pointers to procedures for setting up an active crossover using measurement software like REW?

Thanks!
 

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Welcome to HTS!

I am unfamiliar with the Xilica. What kind of speaker are you making and what will you use it for? What drivers are you hoping to use?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Welcome to HTS!

I am unfamiliar with the Xilica. What kind of speaker are you making and what will you use it for? What drivers are you hoping to use?
Thanks!

I should have mentioned that these are commercial speakers. I am using them with outboard passive crossovers. The manufacturer likes the use of active crossovers but doesn't provide precise settings, leaving that to the customer. A suggested starting point is 18dB/octave at 1400Hz. I have read some interesting info regarding use of 4th order Linkwitz Reily

They are tower speakers, with 6 5.25" mid-bass and a 45" ribbon mounted coaxially.

I was hoping to find some guidance on how to set up an active crossover using REW or something similar.
 

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I see. What you really need for a full range speaker is crossover design software. Active crossovers are "easy" so it should be straightforward. You'd need to capture the raw response of the woofers together and the tweeter separate, or whatever configuration they are intended. I would assume a 2-way. You could measure with REW (with a trusted mic) and convert the measurements into .frd files, then input them into PCD7 which has an active filter section (also inputting physical offsets and driver size). Then you just play with filters until it looks good!

By measuring the speakers in their cabinet you'd skip a lot of the headache that other people face when trying to design a speaker solely in the simulation environment.
 
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