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Discussion Starter #1
I recently purchased the Yamaha RX-V665 receiver after upgrading to a new LCDTV (Samsung LN40B650). (It was my first home theater receiver purchase ever, but is my third Yamaha receiver purchase.) Since the unit was not at the lowest end of the Yamaha product line, I reasoned that it would most likely have most of the bells and whistles that *I* would ever want. While familiarizing myself with the unit by reading the owner's manual, however, I saw that the "highest" video signal it supported was 1080p/60 Hz. This information was at the back of the manual, almost a type of footnote. It was not part of the "specs" on either the retailer's or Yamaha's websites. I believe my new Samsung TV is capable of 120 Hz. Thus, I am reasoning that the performance of my TV is now limited by the receiver that I have chosen. Am I correct? Is this a big deal? If this is a limitation, is there any way around it? Sadly given the retailer's online purchase policy I can only return the unit if it is defective, and even then they would only replace it for the same unit. I'm a little bummed.

Al
 

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The TV will process the 60hz signal to change it to 120hz, it will still be 1080p/60 when it passes through the AVR. There shouldn't be any problems.

Hakka.
 

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I believe my new Samsung TV is capable of 120 Hz. Thus, I am reasoning that the performance of my TV is now limited by the receiver that I have chosen. Am I correct? Is this a big deal? If this is a limitation, is there any way around it?
I think most newer TV's will upconvert any signal they receive to their native resolution (1080p/120Hz in this case) ...:yes:

But to be sure, I suggest you to contact Samsung and ask them :T
 

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Thanks for the replies. I will check out the what the owner's manual of my TV says about the topic. I am a little "electronically challenged" about such things. If I'm understanding correctly, you are suggesting that all the data will be passed through, but it is the final "decoder," i.e., my TV, that determines the signal. I was thinking more along the lines that data would be lost (and non-recoverable) if it passes through a less powerful/sensitive source and would, thus, not be available to be read by TV.

Al
 

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I was thinking more along the lines that data would be lost (and non-recoverable) if it passes through a less powerful/sensitive source and would, thus, not be available to be read by TV.
Idon't think so ...like you said: Signal will pass through untouched to TV :yes:
 
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