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If you’re in the market for a new mid-priced AVR, then you’ll want to keep reading.

Yamaha has recently added two new models to its flagship line of AVENTAGE network AV receivers. They have been unveiled under the classification of the RX-A 30 Series, replacing previous models of the RX-A 20 Series. These latest receivers have some key features that are sure to interest home theater enthusiasts looking to enter Yamaha’s flagship series on a budget.


"Each spring we stake our claim to the high end home entertainment market with our flagship AVENTAGE AV receivers" said Bob Goedken, general manager, Yamaha Corporation of America, AV division. "Our team of engineers and designers in Japan and the U.S. have again worked their magic to craft statement pieces that provide the ultimate sound and video quality for the most discerning listeners."

In addition, Yamaha has announced a sweepstakes for a free give-away from its RX-V 75 line of receivers.


Models and pricing

These two new models will occupy the lower-end of Yamaha’s flagship AVR line with MSRPs below the $1,000 mark. They include the RX-A730 for $699.95 and the RX-A830 for $899.50, both priced the same as last years A720 and A820 models. To keep these price points in perspective, last years RX-A 20 AVENTAGE line offered buyers 5 models, with the upper echelon of the series priced between $1,199 and $2,199.

Key features

The A730 and A830 models have enough bells and whistles to keep the most picky of users quite happy. They include:

  • Relatively decent power output (A730: 105W per channel, A830: 110W),
  • Eco Mode (lowers power consumption by up to 20%),
  • 4K image pass-through and 4K upscaling,
  • Yamaha’s proprietary Anti-Resonance Technology Wedge (a 5th foot in the center of the AVR used to dampen vibrations from the power transformer, transistors, heat sink, and vibrations resulting from sound within the room),
  • Wireless AirPlay allowing users to stream music via an iPod, iPhone, iPad, or iTunes on a Mac or PC,
  • Unit control via a smartphone or tablet using the Yamaha AV Controller App (available from iTunes and Google Play),
  • An updated multi-language graphical user interface,
  • And YPAO room correction software.

Primary differences between the A730 and A830

The A730 and A830 models are nearly identical, with the A830 offering a few features that make it slightly more appealing. In the amp section, the A830 offers a rather negligible boost in power per channel (only 5 Watts) and about 10 Watts more in dynamic power per channel. For connectivity, the A830 offers two more HDMI inputs (a total of 8), front analog audio inputs, full 7.2 pre-outs, and an RS-232C terminal connection. On the room correction front, the A830 trumps the A730 with a slightly better version of the Yamaha’s proprietary room correction software known as YPAO. The biggest different being, the A830 allows users to take room measurements from multiple points (up to 8 positions) which helps to create better sound across a wider listening area.

Physically speaking, both units are the same size (17-1/8” x 6-3/4” x 14-1/2”) and weigh in at roughly 23 lbs (the A830 out weighs the A730 by a mere 0.3 lbs). Also both models feature Aluminum front panels that Yahama says shield the internal components from noise and electronic radiation emanating from various external sources.

Sweepstakes giveaway

Yamaha has also announced a rather exciting give-away sweepstakes. The prize? A brand new RX-V575 receiver (MSRP $549) from its RX-V 75 Series of receivers. There are a few strings attached, of course. To participate you must be a US resident and entries are made through a Facebook account. The good news is you can enter to win this receiver up to five times daily (until May 9th) by following this link.

Image Credit: Yamaha Corporation of America
 

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How good are Yamaha receivers? Say, comparing to Denon, Onkyo, Sony, etc?
 

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Its been well known that Yamaha makes a sturdy receiver that lasts. They are not the strongest in the room EQ department YAPO does not do any filtering to the sub channel till you get way up in the price range.
They also dont have the strongest amplification sections in there low to mid end receivers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Seems to me that a few members on here have noted that they feel their Yamahas have a certain warmth to them? At least I remember something along those lines.

It's hard to tell though... one mistake in a set-up process... or failure to tweak something... can make a big difference, as we all know too well. :D

I'll be curious to read some professional reviews about these new Yammys, especially a bench test, hopefully.
 
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