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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm in the prep stages of building a pair of Zaph ZA5.3t small towers. I originally was looking at the ZA5.2's but my wife really likes the look of towers and they'll fit the room we'll have when we move as planned (downsizing).

All I have so far is a few supplies on order (circle jig and some router bits) and a Sketchup model of the enclosure. I have the tools to do rabbets and dados on my table saw so the model reflects that intent. I've attached the Sketchup Make 2014 file for those that can open it and a PDF for everyone else.

Links to posts with Uploads, Pics, and such:

Cut Sheet

Crosscut sled: Pic - Sketchup Model - First Construction Post - Second Construction Post {Addendum 4/22/2014} - Third Construction Post {Addendum 4/22/2014}

Updated Cut Sheet

Terminal Cup Used

Kit from Madisound [unboxed]

Build - First Cuts Notches for the sides. Long edge rabbets End rabbets and dadoes Terminal Cup and Port Baffle

Baffle Template & Crossover Placement
 

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Discussion Starter #2
A little correction; the round over on the base is 1/2".
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Somehow the base was moved out of position in the model. That has been corrected as well as the round-over (1/4 vs. 1/2) issue. The .skp file in the OP has been replaced.

If anyone sees any other issues please let me know. Being embarrassed now would be far better than being responsible for messing up someone else's project latter.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I got home from work and the package from MLCS with my router bits was in the mail box. Then I found the box with the Jasper jig on the front porch. Only thing is, now all I can do is wait 'cuz the $$$ for the kit and the MDF for the boxes isn't budgeted till the next pay period (25th).

Rats.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Cut plan for the MDF. Based on a standard 49"x97" sheet.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I know it's sorta early for this but I'll be updating the OP with links to posts with items of interest (uploads, pics, etc.) for quick access.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Somewhat off topic.

I've been putting off building a crosscut sled for my table saw and this is a perfect reason to go ahead with it. If anyone is interested in it, sing out, and I'll include it in this thread. Otherwise i'll keep it to myself.
 

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Somewhat off topic.

I've been putting off building a crosscut sled for my table saw and this is a perfect reason to go ahead with it. If anyone is interested in it, sing out, and I'll include it in this thread. Otherwise i'll keep it to myself.
Sure, let's see it. What's the sled for, do you usually only rip with your table saw blade?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
A table saw crosscut sled rides on runners in the miter slots of the saw table and insures near perfect right angle crosscuts or, in my case, dadoes. It's a common staple in woodworking circles. Basically it's a flat surface with a reference fence on the near side to support the work piece and a back fence for structural support. The working back fence is made to be adjustable in angle and a technique known as the 5-cut method is used to measure the error out of 90°. Feeler gauges are then used to eliminate the error to a high degree of precision. Accuracy of down to 3 or 4 thousandths or better across a 12" run can be achieved. Mine will have an adjustable throat to accommodate up to a ¾" dado stack.

A pic of the model.


I'll do crosscuts and crosscut dadoes and rabbets on the sled. Rips, long dadoes and long rabbets will be along the rip fence with a sacrificial face clamped to the fence, again with the dado stack.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
All I have is my Sketchup model and it's sized for a Ridgid R4510 saw.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Got started on the sled yesterday (Holiday). Had to get a 2'x4' piece of ½" and ¾" ply and a few screws for the miter slot runners.

This is the saw it'll be used on.



First I had to size the ½" to the top of the extended table. Just clamped one corner in place and aligned the edges. Then it was simple to transfer the exact size. I like to transfer when I can. Measurements are OK but just leave one more source of error.



For sheet goods over a couple of feet I like to use a circular saw and a saw guide at the bench then check my work back on the TS. Big pieces on a table saw are too risky for the occasional user and especially when you're alone. To much risk for kick back.



The model shows the fences to be 2¼" tall. I called an audible and opted for 2½" for a little more support at the throat. I first ripped four 4' lengths 3" wide. I used the factory edge for two to use as reference edges later. Two pieces we screwed together leaving the factory edge on each assembly proud. I set that against the saw fence and ripped just enough off to get a clean straight edge across both pieces. I did the same on the other fence assembly then reset the saw fence for the 2½" cut. I cut them to both to width with that setup using the newly cut edge against the fence.



Then I separated them and cut the notch for the adjustable throat ends. Then reassemble them using the original screw holes for reference, this time with wood glue and clamped them down.



When the glue set up enough to remove the clamps I separated them and cut to length. The working fence was cut to a length matching the length of the sled base (transfer again) and the back fence was cut to 24½" per the model. That's just to reduce weight. Some plans call for cutting the unsupported corner off at a 45° angle for the same reason. This is a small sled compared to some I seen on big cabinet saws so I left it as is.

The last thing I did last night was to cut the runners. I like UHMW for sliding parts both for the wear characteristics and the natural lubrication. I like it but it isn't cheap but a good substitute is the material used to make cheap, white, plastic cutting boards. I use the Mainstay brand sold at Wal-Mart.



They're just a little thinner than the depth of the miter slots so al that is needed is to rip them down to a smooth but close fit. Just cut them a little wide on the first one. Then slowly reduce the width, checking with each cut till you sneak up on the right size.




That's where I left it last night. My son came in last night for Easter so I don't know how much more I'll get to this weekend.

-Later-
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
The next thing is to attach the runners to the base. Since the runners are thin compared to the depth of the miter slots they'll need to be raised. Coins are normally used. I ended up needing a nickel and a penny.



Pre drill the runner for the screws, then place a strip if double sided tape to the top side of the runners and position them into the miter slots. Carefully lower the base down onto the table to stick the runners to the bottom of the base. To keep the base located I clamped some boards to the outer edges of the TS table to use as guides (not pictured). Carefully lift the base and turn it over. Attach the runners to the base with screws using the pre-drilled holes as guides. The double sided tape will add friction to the runners and help prevent them from shifting during use.



Good time to dog ear the fences before attaching them to the base.



On the working fence use one screw on each end and one or at the most two screws between for now. You'll add more later but you'll be moving the fence slightly during the calibration process and those holes can't be reused (except for the one on the far end). On the rear fence use as many screws as you deem needed to FULLY support the base on BOTH sides of the cut line. Once cut the base will be in two pieces and the rear attachment will be its only support during the calibration.


addendum included: in italics and bracketed{}
Now it's time to make that cut. With the sled off the table saw raise the blade to the max working height for the sled. For me that was 1½" {above the surface of the base}. {Insure you don't cut through to the top of the fence. Enough of the fence must remain intact to provide structural support.} Place the sled on the leading edge table with the runners in the miter slots. Hold the sled in place and start the saw.

NOTE THE POSITION OF YOUR HAND ON THE FENCE. IT'S VERY EASY TO LEAVE A FINGER OR THUMB ON THE BACK SIDE OF EITHER FENCE IN THE PATH OF THE BLADE. THIS WILL MAKE FOR A VERY BAD DAY AND A TRIP TO THE EMERGENCY ROOM. KEEP YOU BODY PARTS CLEAR OF THE CUT PATH.

Now make one smooth full stroke for the full width of the sled insuring that the saw blade completes the cut through the working fence.



[Now you can see why I like to transfer instead of measure. My measurement for the fence notch was off]

Next post we'll do a calibration and make the sliding throat.
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
Calibration

Some use a simple one cut and flip method to check their sled for square. If you want the best accuracy the 5 Cut Method is the way to go. Here's a link to Google search for the instructions. Any of the first 5 will explain it.

5-Cut Method (google search)


I used a piece of ⅛" hard board for the test. Make sure you have a shop brush available. Sawdust is thicker than some of the errors you're trying to eliminate so it'll need to be swept away between cuts. First I marked a line on all four sides for the cuts with an extra line on the fifth (first) side. Also, due to the layout of my table I'll be cutting with the work piece to the right of the blade.



Make the 4 initial cuts then the fifth final cut for the test. I marked mine with an "F" and an "N" for "far" and "near".



After measuring with my calipers I was left with an error of .038".

.038/4 = .0095" across ~16" or a little less that 1/128th over 12". Not bad but I tryed for a little better. I got my set of feeler gauges and found the .009" blade. Since the wider end of the cut of was on the far end I needed to move the fence in that direction. The set up for the move requires that you first set the feeler gauge against the fence and clamp a refernce block to them to fix the distance between the block and the fence. Then clamp the block to the base to prevent it from moving when the first clamp is removed. Remove the first clamp and all the screws holding the fence in place except the one on the far (in my case, right) end. Remove the feeler gauge and re clamp the fence to the block, closing the gap that was made by the feeler gauge. This should remove the error. Re-attach the fence to the base BUT DON"T USE THE ORIGINAL SCREW HOLES. Doing so will just pull the fence back to it's original position. New locations are a must.



Re-test. I must have clamped a little too hard because I ended up with an error of .018"

.018/4 = .0045" across ~15" or about 1/256th across 12"

Wood won't hold that over time and humidity so no need to try for more.

Now you can leave it as is (still need a blade guard on the back) but I wanted an adjustable throat to maintain zero clearance across various blade widths (.097" thin kerf crosscut to ¾" dado) so I had to take the right side of the base {off} to cut the sliding portion off. Before I did I marked the end of the fence slot to show where to cut. That was cut and set aside for later.

I also needed the slotted vertical blocks to lock the adjustments down. I ripped a piece of one of the ¾" ply cutoffs to a little less than 1½ and marked a center line along the length. Mark off the centers of two ¼" holes 1¼" apart twice with the two pairs of marks separated by 4" or more. Drill the ¼" holes at the marks with a drill press (if you don't have access to a drill press I wouldn't even think of using the router table later in the process). Measure ¾" from the opposing edges of the holes outward and mark cut lines for the ends of the blocks but don't cut them yet.


We need a slot cut in the block to allow for adjustment. I do this on a router table. This can be tricky. You can use a plunge router on a bench but you'll need a way to secure the work piece and outriggers to stabilize the router base. If you don't have access to a router or router table you can drill a number of inline holes and go with a wood chisel. Slot the blocks between the two holes.



Use the block(s) to mark and cut the final width of the base strip you set aside earlier. Attach the blocks as shown in the pic below.



Addendum added:
With the adjustable strip in place mark the center of the full adjustment path {on each fence} and drill and mount a threaded insert {in each fence}. Install a threaded knob and you're done (except for the guard).

 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
I managed to purchase the MDF. I had HD do the major cuts to break down the sheet to a manageable size. I also modified the cut sheet to use more of the factory edges. Plan to place the order for the kit from Madisound today.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Got the kit ordered yesterday.:spend: Last FedEx update had it in Chicago with a delivery estimate of Friday.:D

I ordered the terminal cups from Amazon. Same item as from Parts Express but a few $$ less shipped. I want the bi-amp option.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
The kit came in a day early (man, that was quick). I'll get some unboxing pics up tonight.
 
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